Author Topic: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)  (Read 81331 times)

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Offline BBE

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #60 on: November 30, 2011, 12:48:27 PM »
Wren,  :thumbup: and many thanks for the map with the extremely interesting nest info.  That must have taken a lot of time to do.   To have that documentation is super.  :ty :heart
Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. (Anonymous)
Avatar is of Karula (female leopard). May 1, 2013

Offline boonibarb

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #61 on: December 29, 2011, 10:43:13 AM »

Recently, i have been spotting youngsters!
There have been three occasions where i have been in my yard, heard trilling, & looked up to see a youngster flying over!
One of the Ninelets returned perhaps?
Yesterday there were two occasions when i heard trilling & spotted a youngster flying in the area of Nest #16-19.
Also, one time on monday.
wooohoooo!

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #62 on: December 29, 2011, 02:11:00 PM »
 :thumbup:  Booni!
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline boonibarb

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #63 on: December 29, 2011, 08:55:25 PM »

Oh yeah, i forgot, there were also a couple of youngsters on Tribune Bay, one near Nest #24 & two going feet to feet on my way to work yesterday!
wooohoooo!

Offline cjs

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #64 on: January 14, 2012, 08:22:21 AM »
  I was not able to keep up with the 2011 eagles. Did they survive? :eclove

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #65 on: January 14, 2012, 08:49:43 AM »
Which eagles do you mean, cjs?  Both of the 2011 Hornby eaglets, Alexandra and David, did very well.   They fledged and left for the salmon runs when it was time to leave their nest permanently.   :thumbup:

Here are threads where you can read about them and see screen caps and photos:

http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?board=50.0

http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=525.0

Or, were you asking about other eaglets?
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline winterwren

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #66 on: January 14, 2012, 11:16:11 AM »
As for the other eagles on the island, we are not aware of any fatalities during the 2011 season (though of course we can't look into the nests, so some earlier fatalities in the less-visible nests are always possible).  One eaglet, "Shredder" Helliwell, was too weak to fly and was sent for rehab at MARS. Her story is under the MARS thread on this forum. She was successfully released in the fall. And another eaglet, the youngest sibling from Nest 20, had us worried because his feather tips were damaged by malnutrition. He fledged successfully, and we are keeping our fingers crossed for him.
 
I saw a similar eaglet of the same age at Big Qualicum River on December 8, so I now know that birds with this type of feather deformity can indeed survive those critical first few months after fledging.  (Click here to see the posting about that sighting.)

Offline winterwren

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #67 on: August 09, 2012, 12:10:48 AM »
On July 17 I took a long walk on the foreshore, trying to scout the area from Olsen Farm to Dunlop point for eagle nests. This is a big stretch of foreshore, and if you look at the map (click Here to see it) you will see that there is room for at least one nest. You can see that big gap of shoreline on the lower right side of the map.
On the other hand, if you look at Nest 36, you will find it inland from the middle of that stretch of unoccupied foreshore. So is this nest 36's beach? One of the people who live along that shore has seen an eagle carrying branches... that's really far to carry for that nest.
So, I've wanted to go walk around there at the time of year when the eaglets are really loud, to see what I could see and hear what I could hear.

First, I came in from the Olsen farm end (from the bottom if you look at the map). Those eaglets are REALLY loud. I started walking below the escarpment. The foreshore is huge around Heron Rocks and Olsen farm, but it narrows to a jumble of huge boulders further along, and despite the low tide I could not get through safely.
So, that's one argument against a nest in this area: from the end of the Olsen Farm territory to the beginning of the Dunlops' hunting ground, the intertidal zone is very narrow and offers few of the tide pools that the eagles like to fish from. No midshipmen along that escarpment or around Downes Point.

Still, I thought I could hear faint, faint screeps from time to time.
So I retraced my steps and came in from the opposite direction, from Sandpiper beach, at the end of the Dunlop Point territory.

I walked south-west from there, around Downes Point, until I could see the Heron Rocks and Olsen Farm area.
This is a picture I took near the end of my walk. I am standing on the south side of Downes point, looking south-west. Click on it to enlarge it...
The furthest land mass you see on the left side of the picture is Vancouver Island with its snow-capped mountains. Still looking left, the next band of land is the south end of Denman Island.
The furthest point of land, with rocks extending from it, is Heron Rocks. The Olsen Farm nest is obscured by the left-most boulder.
In the middle background of the photo is the escarpment that stopped my progress when I approached from the other end. Someone who lives on the top of that cliff saw an eagle carrying branches last year.

In the foreground is another one of those mysterious bowling balls from outer space... this one bears a cryptic message in Martian braille.
July 17, 2:40 pm



I walked to a spot closer to the cliff. Behind me, faintly, I could hear the Dunlop Point eaglets. Ahead of me, the ones from Olsen Farm.

In between... Nothing.
Now, of course, negative findings are less convincing than positive ones. Maybe it was nap time... Even with the racket from the neighbours?
Was it the Dunlops I could hear faintly from near the Olsen Farm nest? I'm still not sure.

Anyway. No eagles heard. Plenty of beauty and unusual sightings of other kinds. Two herons flying to perch on branches... I'll post that elsewhere.

Then this:



Downes Point is a large jumble of sculpted sandstone. There is no vegetation on the foreshore; cliffs isolate it from the meadows above. And yet I saw three deer in a row, negotiating the rocky maze. What are they doing here?  :puzzled2

This may be the answer:



Click on the picture. You'll see crystals. Salt!
The highest tides fill little pools; then the saltwater evaporates in the sun, making... Natural salt licks??? Some of them did indeed look as if they had been licked off.

And everywhere, the strange shapes of wind-sculpted sandstone.






Offline Cawatcher

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #68 on: August 15, 2012, 10:07:41 PM »
facinating  :eceek

Offline boodle317

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #69 on: August 16, 2012, 05:56:46 AM »
Wow Wren....incredible landscapes.!

Offline passerine

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #70 on: August 16, 2012, 12:51:16 PM »
Wow Wren....incredible landscapes.!

It is, I do hope next time on Hornby to be able to stroll by there. :ecsmile

Offline winterwren

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #71 on: September 30, 2013, 10:29:23 PM »
This posting may cause some confusion.
That is because it is a full year late.
This is the map of the eagle nests of Hornby Island for the summer of 2012.

I will put the 2013 stats on the map after people have had a chance to look at this one and spot any errors that may be in it.
Click on the map to make it bigger; click again to examine any area in more detail.





The information on this map comes from Booni's observations and my own, and from informal interviews with the neighbours and visitors of the various nests. You can find most of that information in the relevant threads of this forum.

During the summer of 2012, we counted 22 active nests. There may have been at least one more: Nest #3 was proved to be active in 2013, so it was probably active in 2012 also, but we have no data for that year.

We counted 27 eaglets among the active nests. One nest, Nest #7, was definitely active but we were unable to check if it had any eaglets, for lack of time.  One eaglet, on Nest #4, died before fledging, so our eaglet count for the year stands at 26. The actual count is probably higher by anywhere from one to four eaglets.

No eaglets needed rescue and rehabilitation during that season. (I think that's right... Shredder was in 2011.)

We confirmed the locations of two nests during 2012: the Little Tribune/Seawright nest, and the Olsen Farm nest. Eaglets had been sighted or heard in both of those areas on previous years.

Four eagle pairs were unproductive in 2012, either laying no eggs or hatching none. They were Nest #20 at Whaling Station Bay, whose nest was damaged in a winter storm, Nest #22 in Helliwell Park, Nest #36 in Strachan Valley, and the Heron Rocks nest, to which I will return below.

Three eagle pairs moved to different trees within their territory: Belcarra, moving closer to the water from one of Nests #16, 17, 18 or 19; Lunar Rock moved back closer to their old nest site on Tralee Point, and Heron Rocks moved a few hundred metres east of their old nest.
Sometimes the stories only become clear long after the fact. This is the case for the Heron Rocks nest. In the summer of 2012 we saw no activity near the old nest site. With the HIP people, we found a tree that had a pile of branches in it; an adult eagle was perching nearby.  But that pile of branches looked too scanty for a nest. It was only in the spring of 2013 that I saw someone sitting on that pile, now greatly augmented: so what we saw in June 2012 was indeed the start of a new nest at Heron Rocks, and I have added it as such on the map.

Nests #5 and 8 are still a mystery. I have yet to sight either of them. Nest #8 is said to be in thick forest, and Nest #5 is said to be somewhere on private land that we do not have permission to enter. Both locations are very approximate on the map. The two sites are close enough to each other that they may well be two nest sites in one territory. This map assumes that they are, but that assumption may be erroneous. What we do know is that one eagle pair sometimes perches within view of the road in that area, and each year these eagles bring their eaglets to feed on the gifts of a fisherman who lives between the two nest sites. The data on the map comes from this person.



Offline Cawatcher

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #72 on: October 01, 2013, 09:21:43 AM »
Thank you for the update and all your hard work Wren
 :heart