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Author Topic: Macclenny Elementary School, Florida - 2nd grade  (Read 83211 times)
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wildkitten
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« Post / Reply #135 on: May 03, 2014, 07:22:40 AM »



Thank you, AJL for all of your responses!  :-)  We have a large eagle wall outside our classroom with a big calendar posted.  We have recorded laying dates  for Hornby and Decorah, pip and hatch date estimates for both nests, and the dates of the 'real thing' in Dec's case.  We can't see a pip at Hornby, but from our counting, we think we should look for behavior changes in Mom and Dad Hornby on Monday.    From observing the eaglets at Decorah, we know we should look for food to come flying in, for parents to stand and rip up food, and for them to appear to feed.  We know we won't be able to see into the nest, so we will look for 'clues'.  (The teacher is looking forward to this new dialog, especially! lol)

We thought you would like to know that we now have the 'butterfly rehab' area at school.  The science teacher and I ordered some larvae.  Some of the butterflies fell down in the chrysalis stage of development and came out "wrinkled".  We figure, from the books we have, that their wings could not properly expand during their 'hatch' and it had an effect on the blood flow, and therefore, we have some handicapped butterflies that can't stretch out.  Somehow, they all are making their way to room 401!  Since they cannot be released into the wild.....  ambassador butterflies.  They will let us examine them close up, so that is very interesting, indeed.  Tiny little legs that tickle, and furry little bodies...  we are so excited about all of this!  They have a varied fruit diet, and flowers and leaves to crawl on.  Of course, in true Hornby style, we have named them ...  Wrinkled, Shiver, Almost, and Flutter.   So for as long as they need to, they have a loving home.  The healthy butterflies will be released into the garden on Monday so they can do their butterfly things....    heart and thank you from Wildkitten and the Kids... 
 
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wildkitten
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« Post / Reply #136 on: May 03, 2014, 01:56:05 PM »

  question:  our dictionary says raptor are "birds that hunt and kill other animals"  ....Does this make a penguin a raptor? 
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AJL
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« Post / Reply #137 on: May 03, 2014, 02:56:48 PM »

Dear Wild Kitten and Little Scientists,
I think it is wonderful that you will be releasing your butterflies on Monday!  We hope you will tell us how the release goes and what you thought and felt when you watched them flying free in their big, wild world.   

Quote
question:  our dictionary says raptor are "birds that hunt and kill other animals"  ....Does this make a penguin a raptor?

No, it makes the dictionary wrong.   mhihi 
Many types of birds eat meat, fish and other aquatic creatures (example mussels, oysters, crayfish etc.), insects, frogs, snakes and just about anything you could name.  Some birds eat only "meat", and others eat it as part of their diets. 

The body of the raptor, or 'bird of prey', is adapted to hunting, capturing and eating prey in special ways, and the raptor is characterized by:
- a strong, curved beak with which the bird can tear meat (the penguin has a bill, with which it catches fish). 
- strong talons and legs, so that it can capture and carry prey. 
- keen vision, so that it can spot prey. 
- flight that is adapted to the type of prey the bird catches.

This website has a raptors video, an activity sheet and games!  It will help you explore the things that make a raptor -- a raptor. 

http://idahoptv.org/dialogue4kids/season5/boprey/raptors.cfm
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There is nothing in which the birds differ more from man than the way in which they can build and yet leave a landscape as it was before.  ~Robert Lynd, The Blue Lion and Other Essays
Tigerlady105
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« Post / Reply #138 on: May 03, 2014, 05:45:12 PM »

I'm looking forward to seeing your stories, poems and drawings about the release of the butterflies on Monday!  I wish we could be there with you.   nod
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wildkitten
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« Post / Reply #139 on: May 16, 2014, 07:37:04 AM »

   May 7, 2014

Today we freed the butterflies that we had for like 3 weeks.  I was sad that we had to let them free but they have to get pollen from our flowers and other people's flowers and they have to be in the wild.  I love butterflies too! 

~Ella
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Tigerlady105
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« Post / Reply #140 on: May 17, 2014, 03:29:40 AM »

Thank you for giving us an update about your class butterflies, Wildkitten.  Some times we have to let go of things that are important to us, so they can continue their natural life cycle.   nod     love
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"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir
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