Author Topic: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)  (Read 88134 times)

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Offline boonibarb

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Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« on: November 13, 2009, 11:04:43 AM »
There are many eagle nests on Hornby Island other than the eagle cam nest. Doug has done an excellent map of the ones he knew of when he wrote his book "The Eagles of Hornby Island" published in 2008. Not all of the nests on the map were used this year, & there are some nests that are active that aren*t displayed on the map. Doug*s eagle nest map



There will be a separate thread for each nest that i have observations & fotos for.

Heads up With all my fotos, if you click on them, you will get a larger version. Also, any bold blue type is a link that you can click on.
wooohoooo!

Offline winterwren

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2010, 09:17:24 PM »
I'm thinking that we could use this thread to post general observations and statistics about the nests of Hornby Island. As we learn more about the other nests of the island, we can compare these nests to each other, and we can also compare our (very partial) statistics to the (much more detailed) observations from the cam.

If there is a better place for this thread, please feel free to transplant it.

Offline winterwren

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2010, 03:11:07 PM »
The Nest Neigbourhood

First up, an attempt at clarification for the people who don't live here and who get confused between all those nests and all those eaglets.

Doug's map, at the beginning of this thread, is not up to date, but it does give you the general picture of eagle territories dotting the foreshore, with the actual nests placed at various distances from the water - just like summer cabins by the ocean. They almost all have ocean view, and they probably all have a slice of shore to call their own (I'm not sure about nest 36).

The cam nest is Nest 10. The other nests that you hear about regularly are all in the same neighbourhood. This is partly because that's our neighbourhood - Booni's, Doug and Sheila's, mine - and partly because we had some close encounters with some of those nests' eaglets this year.

So the nest neighbourhood runs like this: starting from the west, or left side on the map, you can find Nest 6-7 (two nests side by side, only one occupied); the next bit of beach is the territory of nest 9 (Niner's nest). The next territory belongs to Mom and Dad Hornby, our beloved cam eagles. Moving further east, next up is the Wiig nest. It is near the number 11 on the map. We heard the Wiiglet flying over the cam nest in August.

Next along the shore is the Brigantine nest, home of Li'l Brig and Brigadan. And next, just east of Tralee Point, is Decker's nest - we call it Nest 15, but it really is the replacement of nest 15, so to be consistent we should give it a name related to its location.

So there you have them, side by side in peaceful neighbourhood, the nests we've learned the most about. Their attached territories neatly divide the shore, just as lakeshore backyards abut each other.

So now you can start placing the neighbourhood brats that we've been talking about: the 2 strange eaglets with the orange gapes (and their funny-sounding parent) at nest 6-7...  Then Niner and his remaining sibling Ninette...  Phoenix...  Wiiglet...  Li'l Brig and her remaining sibling Brigadan, the climber of trees...  and Decker.

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2010, 05:13:01 PM »
Thank you for explaining more about the Nest Neighborhood, Wren.  It helps to be able to better understand where they are in relation to what is the current information.   :eclove
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Offline Rajame

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2010, 05:20:25 PM »
Wren,

Thank you for helping us that are challenged with understanding how the nests rest. I walked with you in the description. Does it amaze you that you, booni, Doug & Sheila are all in the same neighborhood. Coinsequence? I don't think so.

Probably Mum & Dad orchestrated this all. Afterall, they had almost 1 million views of their nest in just one year!  :nod2

Good to know.

Hugs,
Rajame  :heart
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Offline winterwren

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2010, 06:54:26 PM »
If we return to Doug's map, we see some areas with higher densities of nests, some areas with the nests evenly distributed, and some gaps.
The crowds are mostly past and present nests within one territory; the best example are nests 16, 17, 18 and 19: these all belong to the same pair, who move from time to time. A clever way to solve the problem of parasites without having to build from scratch every year!

The gaps are where I directed my searches this year, in hopes of filling in the data. I found a new nest at Shingle Spit, we learned of another new one at Phipps Point, and I'm still not sure about Nest 3. (Neighbours argue about its latest known occupancy. Visiting the area, I heard someone being territorial, but saw no other signs.)

One area that seemed vacant is the Bench, between Shingle Spit and Ford Cove. The map shows nests 33, 34 and 35, but several outings in the area revealed no sign of occupation. Nest 35 had been vacant for years and seems to have blown down in a storm; the whole area of nests 34-35 was damaged by high winds a few years ago.
What I did find along that escarpment was... a family of peregrine falcons. They are nesting on the cliff. I saw them hassling the nearest eagles, those of the Shingle Spit nest, all summer. And I'm curious to see if the eagles will return to that location. I really don't see why the 2 kinds of birds can't cohabit. Their food sources barely overlap. But the peregrines sure are aggressive.

There is another area that is blank on Doug's map. Another escarpment, as it happens. It is along the subdivision known as High Salal.
I asked a resident about it. Does he see any eagles around there?
"Oh, yes, lots of eagles all the time. And it's special because you can see them flying from above."

Nice. Any nests?
"No, no eagle nests that I know of. But we've had peregrines falcons nesting there for nine years!"

Oh really. You don't say.


Offline boonibarb

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2010, 07:16:25 PM »


Lovely stuff wrennie!  :nod2
You write so well, & i am carried away by your words.
Thanks for analyzing the Nests a bit for us, & fitting them all into the bigger picture!  :hearts2
wooohoooo!

Offline luvthebirds

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2010, 08:52:55 PM »
Winterwren.  Is this the high salal?  I saw a few eagles fly into there early one evening (still light).  At least three.  I was on the campground side of Tribune Bay looking across, so do not have pictures.  They flew from the left as we look at this picture and into the treed area among the houses.  Guess they were passing through to Helliwell nests?  Or nestless although I thought they looked like adults, as I recall.

Ignore the funny looking Mr. Ltb in the picture.   :eclol. This picture was taken in the morning when the tide was lower than later when I saw the eagles over the ridge area.
(And Mr. Ltb's stick was in the water later.)

Photo copyright 2009 luvthebirds

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Offline winterwren

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2010, 08:01:59 PM »
Yes, Luvthebirds, the escarpment in your photo is indeed High Salal - the area where a neighbour reported "lots of eagles, all the time - but no nests".

So, adults without a territory? I was seeing adults and young eagles hanging out in the vacant area south of Shingle Spit also. Or else there are indeed nests hidden in there... but that is less likely on the High Salal escarpment, because there are houses all along the cliff top, so it's reasonable to think that someone would have heard the eaglets.

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2010, 11:23:10 PM »
Luv, that's quite a variation in the levels of the tides!  Thanks for posting your photo so we can see more aspects of Hornby Island!   :eclove
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Offline winterwren

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2010, 05:17:11 PM »
Ok, here it is at last! my own effort at a map of the eagle nests of Hornby Island.
This sums up last summer's observations. Booni and I were nest-hunting all summer; we used the previous map published by Doug Carrick in his book The Eagles of Hornby Island(2008), in addition to our own past knowledge, as our starting point. Other bits of information come from interviews with people who live near the nests.

Click for larger view, then click again to examine specific areas in close up.


This is a real estate map that was graciously donated by Donna Tuele. I have added information relevant to our eagles.

The blue pins show the nests that were occupied last summer. The number on top of each pin indicates the number of eaglets in that nest. Fatalities are circled in red. The eaglets sent to rehab are not indicated on this map right now. There were three.

The transparent pins show nests that were unoccupied last summer, or old nest sites. I have not indicated all of those, only the ones I know well enough to pin-point them on the map.

For the sake of continuity, the nest numbers correspond to the numbers on Doug's map. We have named the newer nests, using names of nearby landmarks.

The peregrine falcon nests are marked with red pins.


There are many wonderful things that I am learning from looking at this map.

There were 21 occupied nests last summer; they produced 30 eaglets. 3 of the eaglets did not survive (Phoenix, one of the eaglets of the Heron Rocks nest, and the Dunlop eaglet). 3 were sent to rehab after they were found grounded and too weak to fly.

The 2 closest nests are #32 (Ford Cove) and Heron Rocks. They are about 425 metres apart.  The next closest nests, at 500m apart, are Phipps Point and #4, and Seawright and #25.

The highest density of nests is right here in the Nest Neigbourhood! From Nest #5 to Brigantine, we have a string of 6 nests spaced 550 to 800 m apart.

Other high density areas: Anderson-Whaling Station, and Seawright.

The lowest densities are on the escapments: High Salal and the area between Shingle Spit and Ford Cove. There do happen to be peregrine falcons nesting on both those escarpments... We're collecting data on the interactions of eagles and peregrines.

Each nest, whether or not it is on the waterfront, seems to have a slice of shore that belongs to its territory. The notable exception is nest #36, located far inland in Strachan Valley. But this nest is equidistant from 2 stretches of shore that seem unoccupied at this point.

Actually, I'm not sure about one of those stretches of shoreline: the one between Downes Point and Olsen Farm. Logically, there should be at least one nest in this area; Booni says the neighbours have seen some territorial activity, branches being moved, and so on. There may be other gaps in the information on this map.

The nests are not necessarily the centre of the territory. Some nests are rather crowded together, but have more foreshore space on the other side. From the location of the vacant nests, we can infer that the territories may be fairly stable, and the nests may move within the territories.

Our observations are always partial... many nests are on private land that we do not have access to. Often we observe from the road, which takes its own twists and turns and misleads us as to how the territories fit together... one big surprise was to plot the location of the Wiig nest and find it... ON Sandstone Point! That's much closer to the Cam Nest than I had thought. And yet Mom and Dad Hornby's territory goes right to the near side of Sandstone Point.

That's about all I can think of for now. I'm hoping to make this map more complete as we learn more about the other nests on the Island.

Modifications to this post, January 12: I replaced the map with a new picture with the errors corrected and a bit more information entered. The text was corrected to reflect new information about a dead eaglet found under the Heron Rocks nest.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2011, 02:09:55 PM by passerine »

Offline muttley

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2010, 05:36:37 PM »
Wren,
          Clearly a labor of love...thank you!!

Offline winterwren

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2010, 05:49:56 PM »
Jon already spotted an error on the map... there are 2 Nests 32! the legit one is on the shore, at Ford Cove. The one inland should be labeled Nest 36. I will correct this next time I get a chance... which will not be today.

Thanks for spotting it, Jon!

Offline NancyM

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2010, 08:03:13 PM »
Wren - this is just wonderful!  A lot of work, but with great rewards in terms of understanding of The Eagles Of Hornby Island  ♥

I am very interested in your observations of the falcons, and if there are any falcon- eagle interactions.  I have awatched a couple of falcon cams over the years - it seems they should not compete, but who knows?
« Last Edit: October 07, 2011, 02:10:49 PM by passerine »

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Welcome to the Other Nests of Hornby Island (includes Map)
« Reply #14 on: November 29, 2010, 09:11:44 PM »
Wren, thank you for doing such a wonderful map with the various pins, numbers and your explanations.  Thank you also to Doug and Booni for working with you on where the nests and eagles are found currently.  Jon, good spotting!  You really are good at finding details...a great skill to have!

Super Team Work!!!   :heart    :thumbup:
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