Author Topic: Audubon  (Read 13477 times)

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Offline beans

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Audubon
« on: September 11, 2010, 01:26:52 PM »
National Audubon Society



Website here:  http://www.audubon.org/

From the website:

Audubon’s Mission: To conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats for the benefit of humanity and the earth's biological diversity.

For more than a century, Audubon has built a legacy of conservation success by mobilizing the strength of its network of members, Chapters, Audubon Centers, state offices and dedicated professional staff to connect people with nature and the power to protect it.

A powerful combination of science, education and policy expertise combine in efforts ranging from protection and restoration of local habitats to the implementation of policies that safeguard birds, other wildlife and the resources that sustain us all—in the U.S. and Across the Americas. 

Successes include:

•   Protection of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and other fragile habitats;

•   The ongoing recovery of the imperiled California condor and brown pelican;

•    Adoption of innovative policies that balance habitat protection with green energy development on millions of acres;

•   Continuing restoration of the Everglades and Long Island Sound
How we do it:

•   Nearly 500 local Chapters nationwide engage members in grassroots conservation action;

•   Audubon environmental policy, education and science experts guide lawmakers, agencies, and our grassroots in shaping effective conservation plans, actions and the policies to support them;

•   More than 2,500 Audubon-designated Important Bird Areas identify, prioritize and protect vital bird habitat from coast to coast—in partnership with BirdLife International, our IBA conservation efforts support species and their habitats across the Western Hemisphere;

•   “Citizen Scientists” collect vital data, through Audubon’s annual Christmas Bird Count, the new Coastal Bird Survey, and other initiatives, generating groundbreaking analyses and guiding scientists and policy makers in addressing the needs of birds and other wildlife;

•   Special ecosystem-wide conservation initiatives focus on protection and restoration of the nation’s most special places from Alaska’s Tongass to Sagebrush country and the Louisiana Coast;

•   Audubon Centers and sanctuaries are hubs of conservation exploration, research, and action, allowing millions to discover and defend the natural world;

•   Educational programs and materials combine with Audubon, the nation’s most acclaimed conservation magazine to introduce schoolchildren, families and nature-lovers of all ages to the wonders of nature and the power of conservation at home and around the world.

Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2010, 01:28:04 PM »
I just received my September-October issue of Audubon magazine. 

This issue's Field Notes talks about the return of migrating birds to the Gulf.



From the article:

So far most of the media and conservationists’ attention in the Gulf of Mexico has focused on resident populations of birds such as brown pelicans. But a whole new cast of characters will soon be winging its way south on a path to danger. This fall migratory species will return to their wintering and stopover grounds in open water and marshlands that have been heavily polluted by oil.

You can read more, HERE
Jean, California

Offline jungleland

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2010, 05:30:41 AM »
I thought some of you might like to participate in counting birds for the Great Backyard Bird Count for the US and Canada!  I did the count last February to help pass the winter doldrums.  Check out the website and see what you think!  They also have photo contests which some of you here have fantastic photos you could submit!  Hope you enjoy!   :thumbup:

Jungleland





https://secure3.birds.cornell.edu/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?pid=1983&srctid=1&erid=4470033

Audubon’s 111th annual Christmas Bird Count (CBC) will take place between Tuesday, December 14, 2010 and Wednesday, January 5, 2011. The longest-running wildlife census in the world, the count engages citizen scientists from Barrow, Alaska to Belize and beyond. Since 2000, Bird Studies Canada (BSC) has partnered with Audubon to coordinate counts in Canada.

From feeder-watchers and field observers to count compilers and regional editors, everyone who takes part in the Christmas Bird Count does it for love of birds and the excitement of friendly competition—and with the knowledge that their efforts are making a difference for science and bird conservation.

• Learn how data from the CBC helps birds.

• Participate in the CBC in the United States or Canada

Offline beans

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2010, 01:06:20 PM »
Thanks, jungleland!

It's not too late to register for a special webcast on Gulf Coast restoration and how we can hold BP accountable for the loss of habitat and wildlife.  This free webcast will air November 18, 2010, 1 PM EST.  It will be archived as well for those who can't make this event.

To register for the webcast from Audubon, Click Here
Jean, California

Offline jungleland

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2011, 05:15:01 AM »
The Great Backyard Bird Count is this weekend!  It is for both the US and Canada.  Here is the link for more information:  http://www.birdsource.org/gbbc/.  Happy bird watching!   :investigate2

jungleland

Offline beans

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2011, 08:43:37 AM »

photo by Greg Breese/USFWS

Last week, Audubon filled the great hall at the Organization of American States, joining conservation leaders from the U.S. and beyond to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act. Senior Interior Department officials were in attendance, as were Ambassadors from Brazil, Panama, the Bahamas, and the Dominican Republic. Both the Interior Department and our international partners recognized the important contributions of this seminal act to hemispheric conservation and called for its continued support. Meanwhile, Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD), one of the most steadfast and outspoken champions for bird and wildlife conservation in the U.S. Senate, introduced his bill aiming to reauthorize the Act and increase funding.

Audubon's President writes about saving neotropical migrants in the March-April issue of Audubon magazine
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2011, 11:07:55 AM »
Good news from Audubon

Good News for Gulf Restoration:




Victory for Endangered Species:



Audubon Instrumental in Step Forward for Bird-friendly Power Grid Development:



New Sage-Grouse Protections Build on Audubon's Science:



Read more here:  Good News Here
Jean, California

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2011, 04:05:28 AM »
Thank you for posting this information, Beans.  I just signed up to get their email alerts and newsletters.  Also, it's a good reminder to renew my Audubon membership. 
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir

Offline NancyM

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2012, 12:45:43 PM »
The current issue of Audubon magazine - March/April 2012 - has an article about satellite tracking birds - "Unlocking Migration's Secrets" and features HOPE the Whimbrel that was fitted with a transmitter by The Center for Conservation Biology in Virginia.

Article is available online:  http://www.audubonmagazine.org/articles/birds/unlocking-migrations-secrets

Offline beans

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2012, 11:51:17 AM »
Thanks, Nancy, for posting that link.  I always look forward to Audubon Magazine arriving in my mailbox!

I’m glad to have some good news to report from Audubon.  Just received this email:


Audubon

Quote
Back in late April, we alerted all of you to a tragedy unfolding in the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge. Because of a shortage of water in the Refuge, thousands of migratory waterfowl were perishing on their way north for spring migration.

Our alarm prompted nearly 20,000 of you to send emails to the Secretary of the Interior asking for more water at this critical time. Soon after your emails hit, the Bureau of Reclamation started new releases of water into the Refuge, and it looks like the the birds will have what they need through the summer.

Clearly, public attention and involvement can make a difference, and we thank all of those who took a moment to speak out. The Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge is widely considered the most important place for migratory waterfowl in the Lower 48, and it deserves our attention. As we noted in our alert, ad hoc water releases are only a temporary solution, and we’ll have to remain watchful in the fall when birds will be need water in the Refuge.

Thank you again,

Audubon California

Information here:

http://www.audublog.org/?p=7540
Jean, California

Offline beans

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2012, 01:18:33 PM »
A Victory for Marine Wildlife and Endangered Birds!



The National Park Service will turn a 2,700-acre area into the first federally designated marine wilderness area on the West Coast, giving Drakes Bay estuary special protected status as an
unaltered ecological region. To do that, Salazar rejected an oyster company's proposal to extend its 40-year lease to harvest shellfish on 1,100 acres of the property.

U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar gave the farm 90 days to move out, issuing his decision a day before the lease was set to expire and one week after visiting the Point Reyes National Seashore for a tour.

"After careful consideration of the applicable law and policy, I have directed the National Park Service to allow the permit for the Drakes Bay Oyster Co. to expire at the end of its current term and to return the Drakes Estero to the state of wilderness that Congress designated for it in 1976," Salazar said in a statement. "I believe it is the right decision for Point Reyes National Seashore and for future generations who will enjoy this treasured landscape."

The estuary, known as Drakes Estero, is home to tens of thousands of endangered birds, including 90 species, and the largest seal colony on the coast. It is within the boundaries of the national seashore, which is visited by 2 million people a year, providing $85 million in economic activityand 1,000 jobs to surrounding communities, according to park officials.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/science/article/U-S-evicting-Point-Reyes-oyster-farmer-4077624.php#ixzz2Dk4uUMHg

Audubon was one of several organizations working on this project.  I'm glad to say I worked on it, too.  And that's one of the reasons I don't make many posts here in the Forum.  So much to do for preservation of wildlife territories.  What's the use of saving an endangered species if he doesn't have a place to live?
Jean, California

Offline passerine

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2012, 01:02:45 PM »
Happy news this place will be saved. You are so right beans, breeding animals in captivity under the guise of protecting their species is bogus. They need habitat first & foremost. They been breeding Hippos for a hundred years it isn't working they are still losing the fight at a fast rate. Save their land & protect them in it.

Offline MaggiesMom

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2012, 01:49:07 PM »
oh Bravo Beans!  I am so glad to know you worked on this.  Have been following it a bit.  Salazar did the right thing.  Feel a little bad for the oysterman who have made their living there all these years but they've had plenty of time to find other places to raise oysters.  We designed a photo portfolio about Point Reyes when it was first designated a national park back in the early 70s.  It was presented by the government to people who were key in the designation fight at the time. I must still have some of the pictures at the office. They were spectacular.
"If you slow things down, you notice things you hadn't seen before." - Robert Wilson, director, author, videographer

Offline Faerie Gardener

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Re: Audubon
« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2012, 04:23:59 PM »
Yay!  Wonderful news.
"In all things of Nature there is something of the Marvelous"  -Aristotle

"A garden is never as good as it will be next year" -Anon