Author Topic: Doug's Updates  (Read 192481 times)

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Offline dotwad

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #45 on: February 06, 2010, 11:45:33 AM »
haha doug, more like good manners we might teach them, always females first.xxxx

Offline Blue

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #46 on: February 06, 2010, 11:46:07 AM »
Thankyou, Doug, for continuing your experiment on "females first".

Ah, but it is a good example for all to witness.   :eclol   Hmm... how many species let the female feed first?
Earth speaks through wilderness.
We still have a moment to listen.

Offline cobbler39

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #47 on: February 06, 2010, 11:56:25 AM »
I just think Pa is very wise. :eclol

Offline Rajame

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #48 on: February 06, 2010, 11:58:51 AM »
Thank you Doug for your observations... I am personally thankful for the many lessons the Hornby Eagles teach us.  And thankful that you are sharing.

As for the Woman First observation... all I can say is Dad knows his priorities!

Thank you again.  :heart


PS.  My first thought for males everywhere was, "Duh," but I thought better than to write that.   :mhihi
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Offline Doug

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #49 on: February 06, 2010, 10:00:18 PM »
THE SHRIMP BOAT - THE PACIFIC RANCHER - OWNED BY LEDO VELOSA

Ledo leaves the Comox boat harbour at 6:30 each morning and returns to the wharf at 5 pm where he stays until 6 pm selling his shrimp.  He fishes in water 450 feet to 500 feet deep (sandy bottom) off our beach about 2 miles out.  He knows Grassy Point and the "Big Rock".

I asked if he ever gets prawns (larger than shrimp) and he said not many.  They are in shallower water where there are rock piles.  I stay well away from there - it wrecks the nets. 

I'm not sure just what rock piles are.  It could be numerous small mountain peaks and shoals sticking up through the sandy bottom or it could be masses of boulders dropping out of melting glaciers from 8,000 years ago - our "Big Rock" being one of the larger ones.

There is a "quota" system to control the number of shrimp caught?  "Yes, I'm allocated 200,000 pounds per year.  But the market has dropped right out out the shrimp fisheries (prices down)."

 I used to see 5 or 6 shrimp boats out there, now it's just you.  "I have a steady market, my mother's seafood store (Portuguese Joe's Fish Market).  The other boats have no market and have quit.  I stop fishing each day when I have about 500 pounds - all that we can sell."

The eagles fly out to your boat, I assume for by-catch.  "There really is not much by-catch.  There are "fish grates" on our nets that keep out most fish larger than shrimp.    But there are a few sculpins, bullheads, shiners and a rare sole or small rock fish.  That's what the eagles are after." 

Offline luvthebirds

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #50 on: February 06, 2010, 11:35:22 PM »
I bet that our dear Dad Hornby also knows how to say "Yes, Dear"!  :biggrin3
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(and don't forget to screep for what you need)

Offline Raptorman

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    • The Eagles of White Rock
Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #51 on: February 07, 2010, 12:33:06 AM »
Doug,
When I worked on fishing boats the seaguls seemed to instinctively know whenever I was cutting bait or cleaning fish. Sometimes hundreds of them would show up.
I noticed that you mentioned the eagles allowed the gulls to peck at the fish heads before the eagles took them. I've been told that the eagles don't have much or any sense of smell. I'm wondering if the gulls do? And if maybe the eagles rely on the gulls to find food.
I'm also curious about the interaction between the gulls and the eagles when they are not on the beach. Do the eagles take the food from the gulls when they are near the fishing boat? And have you seen the seagulls team up in groups of a half dozen or so and attack the eagles from above and behind like the crows sometimes do?

Offline Doug

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #52 on: February 16, 2010, 10:33:14 AM »
HERRING SPAWN COMING - due on first week of March

This morning I spotted our eagles and neighbouring eagles flying out a mile or so and back again.  Hunting for herring?  In the telescope I could see long lines of seabirds floating on the water - mainly Pacific loons, cormorants, merganzers - diving down for the herring below.  Many gulls were waiting to steal whatever they could.

The eagles were on reconnassance patrol.  None dove down to try a theft job.  Probably watching for a herring ball to make their effort worth while.  A herring ball is a great boiling up of herring, when chased to the surface by fish, seals or sea lions chasing them from below.   

The massive schools of herring come closer in each day until early March when the spawn takes place, attaching millions of eggs ot the seaweeds close to shore.  Not far away now.


Offline Doug

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #53 on: February 16, 2010, 07:12:43 PM »
Somewhere around 5 pm 18 eagles and thousands of gulls were picking herring from the water a mile or two out.  I've always felt the herring run is the kickstart energizing the breeding season.

Offline Doug

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #54 on: February 22, 2010, 10:48:38 AM »
MATING, THIS SEASON TO DATE

Dec 31, 2009              Love Tree            (earliest observation by far)
Last day or two of Jan           (has happened before, but not this year)

Feb 1, 2010     2:25 pm    Peters' Tree
Feb 11            4:09 pm     Love Tree
Feb 12           10:02 am    Peters' Tree
Feb 17             3:50 pm    Love Tree
Feb 20             5:43 pm    Peters' Tree
Feb 22             9:45 am    Peters' Tree

These are observations I have made, but the eagles would have mated many more times than that.

Offline AJL

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There is nothing in which the birds differ more from man than the way in which they can build and yet leave a landscape as it was before.  ~Robert Lynd, The Blue Lion and Other Essays

Offline Rajame

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #56 on: February 22, 2010, 12:53:24 PM »
Thinking and pondering how glad I am not to be a herring!!  :ecnono
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Offline passerine

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #57 on: February 22, 2010, 06:01:32 PM »
Do some Robins over winter on Hornby?

Offline Doug

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #58 on: February 22, 2010, 09:51:25 PM »
Yes.  Robins all year round.

Offline Doug

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Re: Doug's Updates
« Reply #59 on: March 02, 2010, 11:38:43 AM »
HERRING SPAWNING AT GRASSY POINT, HORNBY ISLAND

1991 - Mar 13         
1992 - Mar 13
1993 - Mar 1
1994 - Mar 9,10, & 11
1995 - Mar 11
1996 - Mar 11,12, & 13  (best in several years)
1997 - Mar 13, & 14
1998 - Mar 7,8,9, & 10   (el Nino - very mild winter)
1999 - Mar 5, 6, & 7      (3 or 4 killer whales feeding on herring)
2000 -  no record
2001 - Mar 6, 7, & 8
2002 - No spawn on Hornby - further south, Bowser to Parksville
2003 - Mar 15 & 16   record biomass (150,000 tons - downhill since)
2004 - Mar 9, 10, & 11
2005 - Mar 1,2,  4, & 5   (outstanding spawn)
2006 - Mar 6, 7, & 8
2007 - Mar 8, 9, &10
2008 - No spawn here   (eagles didn't even lay eggs that year)
2009 - Mar 21, 22, 23, - 25, & 26  (latest ever - coldest winter)
2010 - Mar 1    may be more to come    (el Nino -  mild winter)

AVERAGE FIRST DAY OF SPAWNING  -  Mar 8th