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Author Topic: Doug's Updates  (Read 161506 times)
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Tigerlady105
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« Post / Reply #300 on: June 22, 2011, 03:38:44 PM »

Doug, thanks for keeping us in the loop about Mother Goose and her goslings.  It makes my heart feel warm to know that all is well.  They certainly can find plenty of food and she doesn't have to feed them, which really helps!   nod

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« Post / Reply #301 on: June 22, 2011, 07:48:01 PM »

Doug,

I have seen the goslings dwindle down here over the years and that is with both parents. The geese also band together, with half a dozen adults and the goslings as a group. They have many enemies - raccoons along the shore at night, the otters, and of course, the eagles. I think the eagles take the biggest toll in broad daylight.
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« Post / Reply #302 on: June 26, 2011, 09:10:34 AM »

DOUGLAS FIR:     All of the Hornby Island nests are built on Douglas Fir trees.  The common name Douglas Fir, is in honour of the Scottish botonist, David Douglas, who first introduced this Pacific Coast tree to cultivation in Scotland and Europe.

However, it was first discovered in 1791 by an earlier Scottish surgeon and naturalist, Archibald Menzies, who sailed with Captain Vancouver while exploring and mapping Vancouver Island.  Thus, its scientific name is "Pseudo-tsuga menziesii", meaning false hemlock, recognizing that it is not a true fir.

Incidentally, Menzies was the first person to climb Mauna Loa on Hawaii.  The trail to the summit is still called the "Menzies Trail".  Using a barometer, Menzies estimated its altitude to be 13,564 feet.  Its actual altitude is 13, 679 feet - not far off.

The madrona or arbutus tree was also first discovered by Menzies and is called "Arbutus menziesii" - arbutus simply being the latin word for tree, just as an arborist is one who works with trees.  When we in Canada call it an "arbutus tree"  we are really saying a "tree tree".
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amazedbyeagles
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« Post / Reply #303 on: June 26, 2011, 09:52:22 AM »

Hi Doug, Thanks so much for those interesting details about the Douglas Fir, and the amusing translation of arbitus tree being a tree tree!!!!  lol
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Doug
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« Post / Reply #304 on: June 26, 2011, 10:03:53 AM »

Up at the Hornby Island Co-op Store, I found out the secret of the T-bone steaks the eagles had in their nest yesterday.  The Store donated them to our eagles.  They were from organically raised Hornby cattle.  They had  passed the recommended date of usage but were still good.  Also donated at the same time was a $40 prime rib roast.  Our eagles are doing OK.  Thanks to the Co-op Store.
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Tigerlady105
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« Post / Reply #305 on: June 26, 2011, 10:20:07 AM »

Yay for the great Co-op benefactors, Doug!  Thank you for letting us know where the steaks and roast came from before they were placed on the beach.   thumbup   heart
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« Post / Reply #306 on: June 26, 2011, 10:26:58 AM »

Thanks for the arbutus/madrona information, Doug.  I have a vested interest!   wink

I wonder if the scientific name "Pseudo-tsuga menziesii" makes allowances for the proper pronunciation of Menzies?   See Here.  

Quote
Why is Menzies pronounced Mingis?

Blame the "yogh", a letter in old English and Scots which has no exact equivalent today.

Pronounced "yog", it used to be written a bit like the old copperplate-style "z" with a tail, which helps explain the discrepancy between the spelling of Menzies and the pronunciation.
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NancyM
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« Post / Reply #307 on: June 26, 2011, 10:43:37 AM »

 thumbup for the co-op store, and thanks for the information, Doug!

Madrona, I have friends whose last name is "Menzies" - pronounced "Men-zees" - I am guessing that the Latin pronunciation of the species name would be similar.
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passerine
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« Post / Reply #308 on: June 26, 2011, 10:45:44 AM »

Doug on Vancouver Island in my area some of the eagles use Black Cotton trees prob because of not having enough Douglas Fir to go around.
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« Post / Reply #309 on: June 26, 2011, 02:02:12 PM »

Mystery of the meat solved.  Thanks Doug - and my thanks to the Co-op too!!!
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« Post / Reply #310 on: June 27, 2011, 11:19:11 AM »

Yesterday I saw our two eagles side by side in the Leaning Tree.  This is on Sandstone Point, the southern boundry of their territory.  As a check, I looked up at the Peter's Tree and there were our two eagles perched there.  The eagles on the Leaning Tree were the Wiig's eagles, the next family, who used to perch on the Flat-top Tree and no closer.  I have seen this happening a number of times this year.  It seems as if the Wiig's eagles are extending their territory and our eagles aren't making a big deal about it.
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birdvoyer
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« Post / Reply #311 on: June 27, 2011, 11:30:03 AM »

Thanks Doug. It will be interesting to see how this all plays out over time.
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Trixie in Ontario
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« Post / Reply #312 on: June 27, 2011, 02:50:42 PM »

I agree Birdvoyer -- it will be really interesting.

I've checked the Wiig nest thread, but don't see much history about this pair.  Doug, do you know how long they have had this territory or any sense of their age?  I'd be curious about how much younger they might be than Mum and Dad.
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« Post / Reply #313 on: June 27, 2011, 05:33:42 PM »

Trixie, this is a post of Doug's about the Wiig's.  smile


At 7 o'clock this evening Sheila spotted what looked like someone swimming off Sandstone Point.  Looking in the telescope, it was an eagle swimming towards shore, dragging a fish too large to lift from the water.  In a one minute period, it made 45 wing strokes - about one stroke every 1 1/4 seconds.  Upon landing at Sandstone Point, it dragged the fish up the shore a foot or two.  I thought it might be a dog fish but saw a broad tail like a salmon, about a foot and a half long.  As it began eating it I could see red flesh.  Other likely fish are Dog fish, rock fish and ling cod but all are white fleshed, so it probably was a salmon.

This is the first time in several years that I have seen an eagle swimnming in a salmon, which might signify a slight recovery in salmon?  After this eagle had been feeding on it for 15 minutes another eagle flew down beside it and shoved him aside - his wife.  He accepted this and went to the water to wash his beak and talons.  She ate some and then flew it to the Sandstone Point nest (the Wiig's nest)

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Tigerlady105
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« Post / Reply #314 on: June 27, 2011, 05:37:16 PM »

It seems like a big challenge to raise two eaglets and defend the boundaries of your territory from neighboring eagles at the same time.
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