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Author Topic: Lindsay Wildlife Museum (California)  (Read 38783 times)
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beans
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« Post / Reply #180 on: September 17, 2012, 10:47:39 AM »

Another reason NOT to use rat poison!

Gray Fox Release

A female gray fox was brought to the wildlife hospital in mid-August. She was bleeding from her mouth and passing blood in her stool. After an initial exam, we determined the fox was suffering from rodenticide poisoning. Fortunately the fox came to us just in time and we were able to start treatments that reversed the effects of the poison. By early September, she had improved, her blood values were normal and she was acting more like a healthy fox.

Last weekend the wildlife hospital released the gray fox back to the wild and shared that experience with seven lucky members of the public. If you would like to be invited to a release of a wildlife hospital patient, visit our website (http://wildlife-museum.org/hospital/releases) and register your email address to be notified.

I saw this little fox in the holding room.  I am so glad she has recovered and is back in the wild. I don't know why people are still using rat poison. If you want to get rid of rats, use snap traps in your own house. Never use poison. This puts many animals at risk, including pets. Outside, Red-tailed Hawks and Barn Owls are the answer.

When rats and mice eat d-CON, a potent anticoagulant poison, they don't die right away. Deterioration in the blood's ability to clot takes up to a week to become fatal, during which time the animal grows increasingly dazed and sluggish and therefore more vulnerable to predators. The poison can then build up in the bodies of these larger animals, sometimes leading to their own demise as their blood vessels, too, essentially explode. This was found to be the fate of three beloved red-tailed hawks in Manhattan earlier this year.

Read about the hawks here:  http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/81470.html
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Jean, California
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« Post / Reply #181 on: September 17, 2012, 11:45:18 AM »

So glad to see another rescue. Sad that it was needed in the first place. We need to be smarter about what we are doing that can affect wildlife.   Thank you for the education.

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beth
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« Post / Reply #182 on: September 17, 2012, 04:20:19 PM »



Miigwetch for the posts Beans....It is such a sad thing the way that humans feel so superior to all of our brothers and sisters.
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"Our true enemies, as well as our true sources of strength, lie within."
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« Post / Reply #183 on: September 21, 2012, 01:56:25 PM »


It is sooo sad, not only for foxes, owls, hawks, but for the mice and rats themselves. It is a horribly painful and senseless way to die. AJL's words which I have repeated innumerable times: Poison anything and you poison everything.
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beans
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« Post / Reply #184 on: September 27, 2012, 12:13:44 PM »


Crows on a Wire

We've always had crows in our yard.  They come around when we put out the peanuts, sunflower seeds, and pumpkin seeds for the squirrels.  I saw two juvenile crows (they have pink mouths).  These may be two of the three I brought home from the wildlife hospital and released into my yard a few weeks ago.

Music by Kevin MacLeod:  Sneaky
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Jean, California
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« Post / Reply #185 on: September 27, 2012, 12:41:40 PM »

 lol thank you beans!!  I hope it was your 3 hanging around!
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beans
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« Post / Reply #186 on: January 02, 2013, 07:13:51 PM »

The hospital received 45 animals last week. The total number of animals for 2012 was 5565 (244 more than 2011).

Thinking about making New Year's resolutions? Think about helping wildlife in your backyard in the coming year. Keep cats indoors. Don't use sticky traps or rodent baits. If you use bird netting, make sure it is secure and off the ground. Use pesticides sparingly or not at all. Keep your bird feeders clean. Help the wildlife hospitals by reducing the number of injured and sick wild animals that need care.

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Jean, California
beans
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« Post / Reply #187 on: February 25, 2013, 11:50:37 AM »

Lindsay uploaded Core 3 Curriculum to YouTube, which compares Mammals and Birds.  This video is an excellent opportunity to see what Lindsay teaches its volunteers!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2_3dnVcGAk" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2_3dnVcGAk</a>

I suggest you watch on YouTube at 480 pixels, large window (or full screen)
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Jean, California
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« Post / Reply #188 on: February 28, 2013, 02:57:31 AM »

Wow Beans  eek! - that is awesome.  Bookmarked   thumbup thank you.
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beans
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« Post / Reply #189 on: July 18, 2014, 09:31:52 PM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdG4unU6nkI" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdG4unU6nkI</a>

Each evening a mated pair of Mourning Doves enjoys a meal at my bird feeder. 

July 16 I rescued one of them in  my yard.  She had probably been caught by a cat.  I took her to Lindsay Wildlife Hospital.  One of the techs I know checked her in for me.  That evening she called me:   The dove did not make it. The bird had been scalped.  Our vet did some suturing and things looked okay until they took rads.  The skull was fractured and brain was protruding.  She was humanely euthanized.

Her mate returns each evening.  He walks around the grass and then flies up to the platform feeder.  He doesn't eat much.  And then he flies off.

Please keep your cats indoors.  Thank you.
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Jean, California
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« Post / Reply #190 on: July 19, 2014, 07:10:58 AM »

What a sad reminder.  I have 4 pair that visit my feeders that I love watching and listening to in the mornings.

When I was young, in he late fifties, we had a Siamese that we would let outside when she "asked".  One day she returned and laid crying on our porch while we were in school.  Mom found her with her shoulder destroyed.  The vet did an amazing job of saving her.  He suspects someone shot her (it was squirrel season) and we never let her out again...not any of our future cats either.

This poor dove's loss is just another reason to add to the list of why to keep cats indoors...for everyone's safety!
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"No one cares how much you know, until they know how much you care."
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