Author Topic: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020  (Read 1554 times)

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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2019, 09:05:54 PM »
On Sunday I had time to go birding, so I got away for a bit but then I got a message that there was a hawk by a church that couldn't fly.  Of course when they told me where I couldn't believe it......... right in my home town and about a 1/2 mile from my place.  The issue was I was 30 miles away,   I sent my husband with a box and a towel.  Hope he can at least cover the bird till I get there.  I get into town and my hubby has the bird in the box at our house.  I was able to get a look at it,  right off you can see it is an adult Red Tail because it has a full red tail.  I checked the wings and it had a small bloody area on the wrist of the right wing, there seemed to be a fracture there.  The other wing was ok.  I checked our transporter site to see if there was someone traveling by my place.  Dang I had missed the ride, so I put a message out that I had a bird that needed a ride.  A gal from Lincoln said she could meet me and she would take the bird to the center.  So now I only had to drive 30 miles to meet her and then she would take it to the center.



A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2019, 09:45:33 PM »
This week the  weather  has turned out really nice,  that means an opportunity to release some raptors.  Back in October I had rescued a Red Tail that had been hit along a country road, she healed and was ready to be released.  The second was a youngster which was also ready for release.    Wednesday is our after school program so it was a great opportunity to have the kids join me in releasing the birds. 

Here is the Red Tail today
 





This is the Red Tail after I picked her up on Oct 25th


For the young Red Tail, he is going to a very nice prairie area north of my town. 







<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSxSjLtVkFQ" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSxSjLtVkFQ</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7cKwmPBmCY" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7cKwmPBmCY</a>

It was a great day,  here is hoping the hawks are sleeping well tonight
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2019, 06:50:05 PM »
It takes many devoted people across the state to rescue and release raptors.  Many times we do a relay transfer.  Today I had a Great Horned Owl that a Game and Parks officer had picked up from a person that called in the downed owl.  He relayed it to me and then I took it to the Rehab center.  It had two damaged wings and also flat flies (which are annoying flies that live on the birds).  On my way I got a message from the rehab center asking if I could take a Great Horned Owl to another volunteer to release it. I got the injured owl to the center and then got the owl for release.   So I made a call to another transporter and asked if she could meet up with me for the transfer, which she was happy to do.  She had rescued the owl and now she got to return it back to her territory.  My owl that I took in was in bad shape so sometimes you just hope it is not suffering anymore.

A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2019, 12:10:51 PM »
Just a few birds in the last couple days.  Raptors and vehicles are not a good mix.  I have had one that had terrible feather damage to both wings and it also had a fracture of its leg.  My guess is only the feathers were broke off by dragging on the pavement while stuck in the grill of the car (only a guess).  Made a nice little nest for it to lay in



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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2019, 12:21:07 PM »
Right before Christmas a Great Horned Owl was needing transport,  we were able to help with a relay.  When I got the owl it was rather busy as you can see by the hole in the box.  I transported it to another driver to take on to the rehab center.





I believe this to be a female just because of the size,  oh she was such a beauty,  I hope the fractured wing will be repaired quickly.
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2019, 12:33:01 PM »
Thank goodness there are people that see a hurt raptor and call authorities so they can get help for them.  Red-tail Hawks live here year round and we get them in with some kind of wing injury most of the time.  This Red-tail has a broken wing up by its shoulder so I was able to wrap the wing and get a body wrap around it to secure the whole wing.  Once I had it stable I found a transporter that would meet me part way and then she would drive it to the rehab.




I gave it a pain pill and a few bits of a mouse before it left.
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #21 on: December 30, 2019, 12:44:28 PM »
Well this is bird number 520 for the year.  It is a Great Horned Owl which came to me during the winter storm we had yesterday.  It was found in the backyard on the ground.  It is very thin but otherwise I could find nothing broken.  He seems alert and hisses with a little clacking.  I got him warmed up and dry,  gave it some water because it was dehydrated.  Started him on a few pinkies last night and after a couple it grabbed the next couple and swallowed on its own.  This morning it got a few more pinkies and water with carnivore care again.  The Carnivore care is a powder substance that has some extra nutrients.  He is hanging in there,  I think the weather and the roads will be better tomorrow to transport him to the rehab center.







Happy New Year !!!
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline Cawatcher

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #22 on: December 30, 2019, 12:53:18 PM »
 :biggrin3 Wow making a difference Deb!

Offline mishikeenhquay

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #23 on: December 30, 2019, 03:17:00 PM »


miigwetch Deb for all that you do!
"Our true enemies, as well as our true sources of strength, lie within."

Offline NancyM

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #24 on: December 31, 2019, 12:57:56 PM »
terrific work, Deb - you are a life saver, for sure!

I have to ask, tho - what is a pinkie?  (not a little finger, I hope)

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #25 on: December 31, 2019, 04:19:40 PM »
Mice are listed in different sizes,  pinkies- small hairless mice ( easy for birds that are really thin and weak so they don't have to use much energy to digest),  small mouse - little fuzzy mice, large mice - adult size mouse,  rat- a very large meal for big raptors.   Hope that makes more sense,  also pinkies with no fur are a pink color.
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline NancyM

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #26 on: December 31, 2019, 06:50:58 PM »
Thanks for the clarification!

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #27 on: January 11, 2020, 01:34:46 PM »
Last week I got a call in the evening to see if I could help out with  a Golden Eagle that was sick,  it was thought to have lead poisoning.
 They needed to get it to the rehab center as soon as possible so it was brought to me about 9:30 at night and we were able to get some fluids in and I put some low heat under it. He was really unable to stand up on its feet,  was using its wings to help with balance.   Later that night I went back and gave some more fluids (water with carnivore care). He was making a strange call so I recorded it. Early the next day I was off to get it to the rehab center.  When there it was weighed and then given some extra fluids for hydration and then a shot of the chelation EDTA medicine which is used to pull out the lead from its body.  I told the director about his calls and I played what I recorded for her.  She said that was a cry he was making,  talk about sadness. The treatment is done everyday for 5 days and then hold for 2 days and then blood work and probably repeat the treatment again.  The reason for keeping the eagle hydrated is the medicine makes the kidneys work really hard to rid the body of the lead.  Saturday he is holding his own but still has a long road to recovery, but he has made it this far.  I hope that getting him to the center as fast as we did can make a difference.  We have to thank our network of transport volunteers.










I was just amazed at two things,  these beautiful feathers on its head and the feathers and talons of its feet.
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline jeavverhey

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #28 on: January 13, 2020, 02:16:54 AM »
Thank you  for doing that Deb and thanks to your volunteer transporters too. I hope he makes it.

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #29 on: January 20, 2020, 08:17:23 PM »
Sad update.....  the golden eagle died this last saturday morning.  They had done one round of chelation treatment and were on the second round.  It still was not standing and didn't have much energy.  The reason I went to the center on Sunday was I had another Golden Eagle and a GHOW to take there.
 The GHOW had head trauma and was doing good at this time,  the Golden was an adult female presenting with lead poisoning.  She weighed in at 8.8 lbs (which she should weigh much much more).  They started her on the EDTA treatment and gave her two things of subcutaneous fluids and offered her some food which she looked at but didn't eat.  We hope that she can make it.   Keep some positive thoughts going for her.  Lead poisoning is such a terrible death and if they live it is a long road to recovery.
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman