Author Topic: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020  (Read 186 times)

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Offline gmadeb3

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Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« on: October 24, 2019, 09:13:12 AM »
Finding an injured Raptor, we have a network of volunteers to assist in getting it to the Rehab Center.  I am one of those stations. 
« Last Edit: October 24, 2019, 09:53:09 AM by boonibarb »
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2019, 07:24:30 PM »
Things are pretty busy these days here.  Not sure if it is because of harvest or the weather (we have had really windy days).  I have had a transport or assist with a relay every day this week.  It started on Sunday with a Turkey Vulture and then later that evening a screech owl was hit by a vehicle.  Monday I left for the rehab center with the 2 birds.  It takes about 90 minutes to drive there and I usually help get them checked in with weight and checked over.  Then Tuesday a person from out in the panhandle of our state brought a female bald eagle and a second bird was a Merlin (he drove 6 hours to get them to me).  I took off right away and drove the trip again to the rehab center.  The bald eagle was found by her dead mate, she was checked for lead poisoning and was positive.  So glad we got her there so fast, hoping for the best.  The merlin was just really thin so some nice meals and hope he will be out soon.  Wednesday comes and now a call about an osprey and a red tail hawk. After work I met another transporter and after checking on the osprey I decided the wing that was broken was so bad that I called another transporter and she met me about 50 miles from my place and she took it back to the center to have better care done.  Now today another call with a Great Horned Owl that was struck by a vehicle and another broken wing.  My wrapping skills are a challenge when you have these strong talons trying to get you.  So for now he is all quiet, tomorrow another trip BUT I can bring back one GHO that is ready to be released.  I will hand it over to another driver who can take it back to the area it was picked up from.


Here is the Eagle being transported.




The GHO with the wing fracture

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Offline winterwren

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2019, 12:02:53 AM »
Thanks for starting that new topic, Deb! It's interesting for me to learn this aspect of what you do.


Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2019, 04:47:28 PM »
Another day and another transport.  Early this morning I got a message that there was a  bird from out west that was really close and if I could meet them I could take both the birds to the center.  So off about 30 miles west and I got the bird.  Now off we go to the rehab center.  The funny part of this is,  the gal thought the hawk was a rough-legged hawk, i peeked in the box and nope.  Rough-leggeds have feathers down their legs and this one didn't,  so now what is this bird?
 I can't wait to get there and get a better look and find out what it is.  As soon as the director sees the bird she knows it is a bird that we rarely see.  It is a Northern Goshawk.  We have only had 5 others recorded in the rehab in 42 years.  So we took some nice photos for ID purposes.  The Great Horned Owl had a broken wing and the other was a dislocated elbow (which is not good).  We wrapped it up and put it in a quiet place for now.  Will get the vet to look at it later.  So now it is time to leave for home.  I get on the road and I get a message, a guy hit a hawk right outside of my home town.  He got out and saw it in the ditch and it was alive.  So I drive home and find it in the ditch with a fracture of a wing.  Tomorrow it will get a ride to the center, I am done for the day.







nice long toes for bird catching

Here is the red tail when found





pretty fierce even though it was hurt



A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2019, 08:54:26 PM »
Here is a little info and explanation of how our rehab relay transport works.  This is the map of our state and I have put a red dot where I live and another red dot where the Rehab center is.  My town is very close to our interstate that runs through our state, it is easy for me to help out with the transfers.  All birds found in the state have to travel to the rehab center on the east side of Lincoln.  It is 455 miles across the state.  If a bird is found anywhere in the state it needs to travel to the rehab center.  That means lots of miles so we have a relay system set up with volunteers across the state, like ambulance drivers we drive and transfer the bird to others to get the bird to the rehab center as soon as possible. Of course when a bird is ready for release we need to reverse the drive so we can get it back to the area it was picked up.  This is a team effort, some people are only transporters and some are able to take care of the bird for a short time with food or initial treatment.  We have a state number that can be called and then the closest person to the area will get the info to go find the bird.  Of course sheriffs and game and parks officers get calls but they are not able to do the transfers.  Transports all have to be on the permit to have a raptor with them.  So that is a brief explanation of how our system works.

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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2019, 03:27:56 PM »
There is no better feeling than to have the opportunity to release a raptor back to the wild. On this day I got a male Red-tail Hawk that was to get his freedom back.  It hasn't been easy,  he had a chance at freedom the middle of July but he just couldn't fly well then so I was able to get him back to rehab for some more observation and some more time for some of his feathers to be come in.  Now here we are the end of Oct and he is finally ready.  Even though it was windy and cold, I know he was ready for his chance to fly.  I got him out and he looked around and he was ready.  I had a friend come and share in this great moment,  she took the photos and shared them with me.










You can see his band,  all raptors have a band placed on them here. 
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2019, 04:56:11 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqS87Q-VBDc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqS87Q-VBDc</a>
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2019, 07:45:03 PM »
Vehicles that hit raptors are common unfortunately -  they are eating road kill along side of the road and can't get away fast enough from a speeding car or truck.  This Great Horned Owl got hit and seems to have an issue with the one eye and is not standing well.  Off to the rehab center tomorrow.  It was given some drops to the eye and pain meds.  Lets hope time will heal it.

A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2019, 06:17:13 AM »
Just a small update on the bald eagle that had lead poisoning.  She  finished her second round of therapy Sunday.  There will be a blood draw today or tomorrow.  She has become a feisty lady,  eating and drinking.  So we hope she continues on her recovery to freedom.  The fast transport to rehab has probably saved her.
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman