Author Topic: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020  (Read 395 times)

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Offline gmadeb3

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Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« on: October 24, 2019, 09:13:12 AM »
Finding an injured Raptor, we have a network of volunteers to assist in getting it to the Rehab Center.  I am one of those stations. 
« Last Edit: October 24, 2019, 09:53:09 AM by boonibarb »
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2019, 07:24:30 PM »
Things are pretty busy these days here.  Not sure if it is because of harvest or the weather (we have had really windy days).  I have had a transport or assist with a relay every day this week.  It started on Sunday with a Turkey Vulture and then later that evening a screech owl was hit by a vehicle.  Monday I left for the rehab center with the 2 birds.  It takes about 90 minutes to drive there and I usually help get them checked in with weight and checked over.  Then Tuesday a person from out in the panhandle of our state brought a female bald eagle and a second bird was a Merlin (he drove 6 hours to get them to me).  I took off right away and drove the trip again to the rehab center.  The bald eagle was found by her dead mate, she was checked for lead poisoning and was positive.  So glad we got her there so fast, hoping for the best.  The merlin was just really thin so some nice meals and hope he will be out soon.  Wednesday comes and now a call about an osprey and a red tail hawk. After work I met another transporter and after checking on the osprey I decided the wing that was broken was so bad that I called another transporter and she met me about 50 miles from my place and she took it back to the center to have better care done.  Now today another call with a Great Horned Owl that was struck by a vehicle and another broken wing.  My wrapping skills are a challenge when you have these strong talons trying to get you.  So for now he is all quiet, tomorrow another trip BUT I can bring back one GHO that is ready to be released.  I will hand it over to another driver who can take it back to the area it was picked up from.


Here is the Eagle being transported.




The GHO with the wing fracture

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Offline winterwren

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2019, 12:02:53 AM »
Thanks for starting that new topic, Deb! It's interesting for me to learn this aspect of what you do.


Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2019, 04:47:28 PM »
Another day and another transport.  Early this morning I got a message that there was a  bird from out west that was really close and if I could meet them I could take both the birds to the center.  So off about 30 miles west and I got the bird.  Now off we go to the rehab center.  The funny part of this is,  the gal thought the hawk was a rough-legged hawk, i peeked in the box and nope.  Rough-leggeds have feathers down their legs and this one didn't,  so now what is this bird?
 I can't wait to get there and get a better look and find out what it is.  As soon as the director sees the bird she knows it is a bird that we rarely see.  It is a Northern Goshawk.  We have only had 5 others recorded in the rehab in 42 years.  So we took some nice photos for ID purposes.  The Great Horned Owl had a broken wing and the other was a dislocated elbow (which is not good).  We wrapped it up and put it in a quiet place for now.  Will get the vet to look at it later.  So now it is time to leave for home.  I get on the road and I get a message, a guy hit a hawk right outside of my home town.  He got out and saw it in the ditch and it was alive.  So I drive home and find it in the ditch with a fracture of a wing.  Tomorrow it will get a ride to the center, I am done for the day.







nice long toes for bird catching

Here is the red tail when found





pretty fierce even though it was hurt



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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2019, 08:54:26 PM »
Here is a little info and explanation of how our rehab relay transport works.  This is the map of our state and I have put a red dot where I live and another red dot where the Rehab center is.  My town is very close to our interstate that runs through our state, it is easy for me to help out with the transfers.  All birds found in the state have to travel to the rehab center on the east side of Lincoln.  It is 455 miles across the state.  If a bird is found anywhere in the state it needs to travel to the rehab center.  That means lots of miles so we have a relay system set up with volunteers across the state, like ambulance drivers we drive and transfer the bird to others to get the bird to the rehab center as soon as possible. Of course when a bird is ready for release we need to reverse the drive so we can get it back to the area it was picked up.  This is a team effort, some people are only transporters and some are able to take care of the bird for a short time with food or initial treatment.  We have a state number that can be called and then the closest person to the area will get the info to go find the bird.  Of course sheriffs and game and parks officers get calls but they are not able to do the transfers.  Transports all have to be on the permit to have a raptor with them.  So that is a brief explanation of how our system works.

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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2019, 03:27:56 PM »
There is no better feeling than to have the opportunity to release a raptor back to the wild. On this day I got a male Red-tail Hawk that was to get his freedom back.  It hasn't been easy,  he had a chance at freedom the middle of July but he just couldn't fly well then so I was able to get him back to rehab for some more observation and some more time for some of his feathers to be come in.  Now here we are the end of Oct and he is finally ready.  Even though it was windy and cold, I know he was ready for his chance to fly.  I got him out and he looked around and he was ready.  I had a friend come and share in this great moment,  she took the photos and shared them with me.










You can see his band,  all raptors have a band placed on them here. 
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2019, 04:56:11 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqS87Q-VBDc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqS87Q-VBDc</a>
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2019, 07:45:03 PM »
Vehicles that hit raptors are common unfortunately -  they are eating road kill along side of the road and can't get away fast enough from a speeding car or truck.  This Great Horned Owl got hit and seems to have an issue with the one eye and is not standing well.  Off to the rehab center tomorrow.  It was given some drops to the eye and pain meds.  Lets hope time will heal it.

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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2019, 06:17:13 AM »
Just a small update on the bald eagle that had lead poisoning.  She  finished her second round of therapy Sunday.  There will be a blood draw today or tomorrow.  She has become a feisty lady,  eating and drinking.  So we hope she continues on her recovery to freedom.  The fast transport to rehab has probably saved her.
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2019, 09:33:51 PM »
Great News on the female bald eagle,  she is ready to be released.  The rehab center is working on finding transport for her so she can be released back in the area she was found.  The mentioned the quick response to the center and getting medicine had saved her life.  So happy we had a good outcome for her,  not always so lucky.  Lets remember "Get the Lead Out"
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2019, 10:06:21 PM »
Seems things come in waves,  haven't had a call for a bit and then with in a couple of hours I get 2.  The first was from a man that had picked up a bird that had struck the window of a building.  He thought it was a Prairie Falcon,  it seemed stunned from the impact but he didn't think anything was broken.  When I got home I thought I would call and see if I could come and get it from him that evening because I had just got a call about a nest of young Barn Owlets that needed to get to the center the next day.  So I headed out for a 30 min drive to get the first bird.  I arrived and he takes me to the bird which he had secured in a box.  I opened the  lid to see it was not a Prairie Falcon but a small hawk, Sharp-shinned  to be exact.  Its right eye seemed a bit more closed probably from hitting the window.  So now back home and I am able to give it a small pain med and a little water,  kept in a nice quiet and dark place.



Now I am home and the man with the barn owlets calls and tells me that he had been checking on this deer blind that had a nest with 7 owlets since the first part of October but had noticed that the week before he didn't seen all of them.  He checked again a couple of days later and he knew that a couple had died.  He decided to put in a couple of duck carcasses for them to eat on because he thought maybe the parents had left.  So when he checked on them Thursday he could only see 2 and was afraid one was really weak.  I told him that I could come up early Friday afternoon but if he could please go out first thing in the morning and capture them and take them to a warm place till I got there.  He called me Friday morning and he had 3 the other 4 like we thought had died.  No sign of the parents, so maybe the cold weather we had was too much for them and they left to go South.  Barn Owls migrate out of the area for the winter and come back in the Spring,  this is also very unusual to have young at this time of the year.  Well I got the 3 and gave them some hydration right away and then took off for home.  Now I need to see about getting them to the rehab center.  They can eat at least 5 mice apiece each night,  so if you have a mouse problem consider getting a Barn Owl family..........   I found another transporter that would meet me that night.  They are safe and doing well now at the center.  Here are a few pictures of them.  I think they would have fledged very soon,  one seemed to have a bit more fluffies still on its back.












A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline jeavverhey

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2019, 06:18:08 AM »
Thanks for what you do Deb. The world needs more like you. :eclove

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2019, 06:20:20 AM »
Oct was a very busy month,  usually not that many calls for me.  I have to keep track of miles and hours logged in hands on care.  As a volunteer the Rehab center keeps track of all the hours and minutes that everyone across the state has.  So my miles added up to 1,180 and my hours were 225.  This month has not been as busy (so far)
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2019, 07:14:21 PM »
Well today was a great day............  We got all our ducks in a row  :duck,  arranging transportation for birds to travel across our state takes some time.  To start with the female bald eagle brought into rehab towards the end of October with lead poisoning had recovered and was ready to go back to her territory.  I had helped with that transport and now I get to help with her going back to freedom.  Made arrangements with another transporter to meet me in my home town.  He was going to drive during the night about 5 hours west to her territory and wait for sunrise.  I did a little smudge with her tonight before I  transferred her to the next transporter.
 I wished her safe travels and told her she is strong and well again because of some fine people who cared so much for her, told her to find another handsome male and continue with a wonderful life. 

I got to the rehab center just as they were getting her band on her leg.  She seemed to know this was the first step to being free.




this is one fine looking Eagle,  what a foot and look at those talons






on the road and I can see the nice big box in my rear view mirror
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2019, 08:00:08 PM »
There was a second passenger in my car today,  not very big that is for sure.  It was an Eastern Screech Owl,  I had picked it up last month at a place just on the edge of my town.  The person found it laying by the door as she was entering the building for work.  Nothing seemed broken but it did seem to have some head trauma.  So I kept it in a nice quiet, warm place and transferred it to the rehab center.  Amazing that today both birds that I had helped with were ready to be set free.
 For the owl it was good I got home just as it was getting dark which is perfect timing to let an owl go.





in my car that big box is where the eagle is  :ecsmile



<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3pIPi3tdSg" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3pIPi3tdSg</a>
A smile is the universal welcome- Max Eastman