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Author Topic: Ford Cove nest - 2017-18  (Read 815 times)
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winterwren
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« on: November 03, 2017, 07:18:05 PM »

This is the topic for the Ford Cove nest and its neighbourhood and all the critters therein.

Nest 32 is very old and perched atop a small sandstone bluff near Ford Cove harbour. In 2013 the eagles moved to a different nest, a few hundred feet further inland. They used that new nest again in 2014, but in 2015 they returned to their old site in that huge conical fir tree that we can see from the beach. They had two eaglets there.
In 2016 the territory was occupied but by mid-July I could see no sign that the nest itself was occupied. I never heard any eaglet sounds in the area. It is possible that this pair took a break last year.
Last year the eagles left Nest 32 again and built in a completely new location, on the tall bluffs above the other side of the harbour. They had one eaglet who fledged successfully.

Click here to see last year's postings and to access links to previous years.


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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #1 on: November 03, 2017, 07:36:20 PM »

I'm still trying to sort out what is going on with the Heron Rocks territory. On a recent kayak outing, I saw an eagle fly with prey to where the Heron Rocks nest has been for a few years. That eagle remained there as I was making my way back toward Ford Cove. Meanwhile a pair of eagles that I had seen, as I often do, in a tree above the Heron Rocks campground was still there. Certainly looks like a different pair... And yet over the years I can't seem to find a nest they would belong to.

Here they are in one of their usual trees. Still a pair with unknown nesting site, or no nesting site.
Heron Rocks campground, October 31, 3 pm



Just after this photo, they both took off and headed to Denman Island. Above the shore of Denman they joined two other eagles and they all trilled at each other and all flew back.
The two new eagles went to perch on a great big log that hangs over the water at the edge of the campsite.
Meanwhile the pair I had seen went back to different perch trees over the Heron Rocks campground.
Everyone trilled for a while, but all kept to their perch and then they just stayed where they were, preening and minding their own business.

Later on the male of the new pair flew off and went to occupy a perch near the old Ford Cove nest. So I'm thinking this newly arrived pair must have been the Ford Cove eagles... Returning from a few hours at a salmon river on Vancouver Island even?

I drifted towards them... Definitely the larger female on the right, preening, and her smaller mate on the left, looking on.
3:11 pm



3:14



The male flies off to a perch by the old nest while the female stays on the log.
3:15



Her nictitating membrane is closed here.



I head offshore to pass by her without making her fly. Her freshly preened feathers still stick out: brand-new, darker ones, mixed with older, lighter, worn ones.  


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Tigerlady105
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« Post / Reply #2 on: November 04, 2017, 01:30:58 AM »

 love
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boonibarb
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« Post / Reply #3 on: November 04, 2017, 11:43:07 AM »


wren, in this foto, it seems like the Eagle has had some damage to the beak that has repaired?
Interesting to see, with the injuries that Dad & Mum Hornby have sustained.
Also remember the foto i got during last Herring Spawn? of an Eagle where you could see right through their nares to the other side?
Also a beak injury that had healed & the Eagle survived.


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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #4 on: November 05, 2017, 07:12:35 PM »

Wow Booni, good eye, once again!

Here's the closest photo of him that shows his left side. Nothing visible on the right.

Dad Ford Cove, October 31, 3:13 pm



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boonibarb
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« Post / Reply #5 on: November 06, 2017, 09:44:46 AM »


wren, it was noticed that the female Eagle has two dark marked tail feather tips on her right side!
Might help with future identifying.
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #6 on: November 11, 2017, 06:22:28 PM »

Today, November 11, in the early afternoon, two Humpback Whales came up the channel to just south of Ford Cove. They were hard to see because it was so windy and wavy out there.
Four or five eagles were flying overhead and dipping to the water once in a while, maybe trying to catch whatever fish the whales were scaring up? I mostly saw silhouettes but there seemed to be at least one immature among them.

We were hoping to see the whales come past the dock but they stopped short of where we were and turned back around.
One person there spends lots of time watching the whales. I asked if he was always seeing the same ones these days or if they were different ones; meaning, were some whales still just hanging out, or are we seeing a parade on their migration south? He said they're all different ones; but apparently there are 19 still remaining in the Johnstone Strait area, where the most intensive study is taking place. He also said that last year a few remained around here through the winter and that researchers expect that more might do that this year.
From what I understand, only the breeders would have any advantage in migrating to Hawaii, where there is less food, but where there are no Orcas to prey on the babies.

This is all new to me and I'm trying to understand bits and pieces of it.  puzzled


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boonibarb
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« Post / Reply #7 on: January 22, 2018, 12:16:24 PM »

 
Okay, again, not brilliant fotos in the rain, but i was curious about the red colouring in with the white on this male Common Merganser?
Whaddya think wren?
Love the drop hanging from his bill & that you can see his foot under the water!
 
january 20 2018 12:41 - male Common Merganser
 

 


You can see the rain pattering in this one.

january 20 2018 12:41 - female Common Merganser
 

 

 
link to my fotos page - 
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/43214021@N08/
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boonibarb
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« Post / Reply #8 on: January 22, 2018, 12:25:55 PM »

 
Not sure WHAT the heck this is?
Beautiful waterfall, though, & gorgeous dog!
 
january 20 2018 12:57 - weirdo & her big dog
 

 

 
link to my fotos page - 
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/43214021@N08/
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #9 on: January 22, 2018, 08:42:12 PM »


Okay, again, not brilliant fotos in the rain, but i was curious about the red colouring in with the white on this male Common Merganser?
Whaddya think wren?




I've noticed that colouring a number of times and I was wondering if it was a seasonal thing, or a nutrition thing (like the rusty colour on the Trumpeter Swans when they come back from the Arctic). But no, apparently it's there all the time: BNA Online describes the male Common Merganser as having "sides of body and rump, breast, belly, and undertail coverts creamy white with salmon tinge."

I think that 'salmon tinge' simply shows up better in certain light conditions. I was reminded of it yesterday while watching a Common Merganser and some goldeneyes near each other. By himself, the merganser seemed white, but seen beside the goldeneyes he had that orangey cast!
I believe that in brighter light, the white reflects light and shows whiter. The rainy conditions in your photos may be the best to show off that colouring.


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boonibarb
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« Post / Reply #10 on: January 23, 2018, 09:49:43 AM »


SUPER interesting!
Thank you wren!
Salmon tinge is a perfect description.
So, not such lousy rainy day fotos after all if we learn something from it.
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #11 on: January 28, 2018, 10:48:48 PM »

I finally got more photos of the Ford Cove eagles.
Given that they love to perch in a tree in the backyard of my work place, it's kinda inexcusable.

Dad Ford Cove is on the left. The same healed-over beak injury as in my photos of October 31, below. Proving that my tentative identification was accurate.
Looks like a round depression, further out on the beak than Dad Hornby's injury.
Click to enlarge:
January 24, 12:20











I was looking for photos of Dad Ford Cove from last year, to get some idea of how old this injury is. Unfortunately I've hardly taken any. But here's one of an adult eagle flying off near the old nest, from April 2017. Look at the second photo in this posting and click it to enlarge it. There is a reddish hole in this eagle's beak!

My previous photos are over a year previous, January  2016. Dad Ford Cove's beak is intact. Click here to see that posting.

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boonibarb
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« Post / Reply #12 on: February 11, 2018, 10:41:57 AM »

 
When you photograph Birds, it is important that they eye is lit.
i never lucked out with that in this foto, but i like it anyway.

february 5 2018 12:11 - Western Grebe





link to my fotos page - 
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/43214021@N08/
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boonibarb
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« Post / Reply #13 on: February 11, 2018, 11:18:24 AM »

 
We were FINALLY getting to go out to look for that Sea Lion with the plastic band around their neck on Flora Island!
If i can confirm another sighting, they might be able to go help them!
But my co-passengers weren*t liking the look of the weather.
The clouds were down low, it was spraying rain.
i was game to go, our boat captain was game, but the longer we debated, the less likely it was getting that we would go.
The weather seemed to be worsening.
It was decided we*d try for another day.
i went home & worked on my puzzle, & the Sun came out!
Figures...

While we were debating, i heard a terrible racket, echoing off the escarpment.
What the heck was THAT?
Turned out a young Eagle had displaced the local Great Blue Heron from their piling perch!
i LOVE when they get these lovely white breasts at this age!
The still dark head feathers make a definite border line against the white, where they begin.
The beak has gotten quite a bit of yellow.
The top of the head & under the chin are turning whiter.
The dark eye stripe of a three year old is developing.
A lovely two year old youngster, entering their third year this spring!
Arbutus branches must be between me & this Eagle, you can see the red of them.

february 5 2018 13:22 - immature Eagle





link to my fotos page - 
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/43214021@N08/
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #14 on: February 11, 2018, 10:03:00 PM »

Orca sighting from Ford Cove!
I was just coming back from my monthly bird count. Very little happening on this side of the island... Something must be attracting the birds elsewhere...
But then this, just as I was about to leave.
They're closer to the Denman shore, and heading south. The sun catching the vapour of their spouts makes for interesting photos.

February 11, 2:50 pm











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