Author Topic: My Nebraska  (Read 91072 times)

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Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: My Nebraska
« Reply #945 on: September 30, 2018, 03:57:19 AM »
Guesses:  Wing shape is one difference.  The 'eye-shaped' spots to confuse predators and the placement of colors are other differences.
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: My Nebraska
« Reply #946 on: October 08, 2018, 09:12:48 PM »
Lets discuss the Butterfly identification differences.  They both have four eye spots but in a different combinations.  The American Lady has 2 eye spots on the bottom wing and two eye spots on the top wing.  It also has a white dot right in the middle of an orange section on the top wing.  The American also is a bit lighter in color.  The Painted lady has all 4 of the eye spots in the bottom section of its wing and is a bit more orange colored.
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: My Nebraska
« Reply #947 on: October 11, 2018, 10:36:07 PM »
The monarch butterflies have moved on just in time because the weather has sure changed.  We have had rain and cold temps for a week now.  I had my last monarch emerge last Saturday (thank goodness there was no rain that day and reasonable temperatures  so he was able to fly off) and there was a wind from the north.  The monarchs are not able to fly if the temps are below 50 F or around there depending if there is sunshine to give them warmth.  The other factor that they are having to deal with is the storms that have been down south.  Lets hope that they have a nice place along the migration path to have food and protection and they make it to there wintering area in Mexico.  Here is a picture of a monarch enjoying a native prairie flower called Pitcher Sage.  The other photo is the flower called New England Aster which is a very good plant for fall nectar.  Lets hope that we can enjoy these monarchs for many years to come.



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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: My Nebraska
« Reply #948 on: October 13, 2018, 09:50:47 PM »
Today was such a nice day after a week of cold and rain so I thought I would go take a look for some birds.  Going by the wetlands there were a couple of Northern Harriers scanning the ground.  The harrier is really a neat raptor but usually hard to get photos of,  always in motion.  This first photo just happened to be as I was walking along this trail.  It came towards me and of course the sun was almost behind the bird.  At least you can see how neat their face is, almost owl like. 




Here the harrier had went down to the ground,  I thought maybe it picked up a prey and then flew off.  Looking at the feet it does have something but it looks like a clump of grass, does that mean it picked up the prey and it got some of the grass with it?


In the same area I see a RT hawk fly up to a telephone pole with something hanging from its talon-- hmmm  the thing dangling is a snake.


Happy Hunting with my camera  :ecsmile
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Offline Cawatcher

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Re: My Nebraska
« Reply #949 on: October 14, 2018, 07:23:12 AM »
Exciting  captures Deb!

Offline gmadeb3

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Re: My Nebraska
« Reply #950 on: October 14, 2018, 08:29:02 AM »
  If anyone looks at sparrows you realize how many there are and how difficult they are to ID.  It is fun and challenging to come up with the correct answer but then again you need to also look for sparrows.  I think sometimes we see a small brownish bird and just say it is just a sparrow.  While out yesterday I saw a little bird fly into the tree right along the roadside.  I stopped and looked closely and of course I couldn't tell what it was so I took a few pictures of it.  Turns out after looking at many pictures and having a bird ID discussion on the chat that the sparrow I saw is called Vesper Sparrow.  There is a challenge when you look closely at them.  Enjoy looking for the small brownish busy little birds.




To view  another post about sparrows, click here
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: My Nebraska
« Reply #951 on: October 15, 2018, 08:37:10 PM »
Fall is a time for migrations or  for things to find a nice spot to hibernate and wait for transformations.  I just happen to find a couple of caterpillars around my tree and woodpile  in the backyard.  One is called an American Dagger which the hairs can cause an irritation to the skin, and the other is a Wooly Bear.  These caterpillars will turn into moths next spring, in the meantime they need to find a way to make it through the winter.  The yellow fuzzy caterpillar with a couple of black antenna will over winter as a pupae in a cocoon made with their hairs.  They will emerge in the spring as a moth and lay their eggs on the leaves which they will feed on during the summer and by fall they are a full grown caterpillar which then comes down from the tree to find a sheltered area to make its cocoon.  This is the same life cycle for the wooly bear caterpillar also.  The first picture has a caterpillar in the cocoon and right next is the caterpillar getting ready to pupate.



This is the wooly bear all curled up in a leaf


So now we wait til spring and see what they look like as a moth...........
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Offline gmadeb3

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Re: My Nebraska
« Reply #952 on: October 17, 2018, 09:16:07 PM »
I got my pumpkins the other day,  not really for Halloween or for fall decorations but for my squirrels.  So if you get a pumpkin you may think about giving the wildlife a nice treat.   I cut it open and let it set for a couple of days and the squirrels finally decided it was ok to finally check it out.  They were digging in for the seeds but also were enjoying eating on the pumpkin itself.





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Offline NancyM

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Re: My Nebraska
« Reply #953 on: October 18, 2018, 09:13:18 AM »
Very cool, Deb!  I offered pumpkin to my backyard critters a few years ago and they refused it. I thought that since the cranes liked pumpkins, other critters would too.  I guess the pumpkins are better in Nebraska.  :puzzled2

Offline Tigerlady105

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Re: My Nebraska
« Reply #954 on: October 18, 2018, 07:55:55 PM »
Yummy wildlife treat, Deb!     :thumbup:
Commit random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature; he finds it attached to the rest of the world". ~John Muir