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Author Topic: Heron Rocks Nest - 2015-2016 season  (Read 17502 times)
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Cawatcher
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« Post / Reply #15 on: November 05, 2015, 07:00:22 PM »

Remarkable thank you winterwren for this
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jeavverhey
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« Post / Reply #16 on: November 05, 2015, 10:16:39 PM »

That is astounding information to me. I always thought ducks moved together in flocks puzzled of course the individuals being sited may not have been alone as they moved but clearly not all moved together in their group. Very interesting for sure. So nice that you girls are there to observe and share with us. Thank you.
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #17 on: November 06, 2015, 08:40:28 PM »


Here are bits from a further report on the movement of the satellite-tracked Harlequins. Again this report is from Sean Boyd of the Canadian Wildlife Services and is reproduced with permission.

White Rock Harlequin ducks (14 birds tagged March 2015)

"144764 and 144768 were a definite pair nesting in the Kootenays; the male moved to the coast during the last week.

"All signaling males (5, including the only marked HY male) are now on the coast and all are well north of WR [White Rock], from Pt McNeil to just north of Prince Rupert. I certainly didnít expect them to go so far north to molt, especially as far as Prince Rupert! These birds were assumed to be overwintering in WR when captured so the $64K question is: how many of them will return to WR in Sep-Oct to reunite with their hens? I guess weíll find out soon enoughÖ

"2 hens died in the BC interior (likely predated) and 2 others havenít signaled for 6 weeks so they may have been predated. 1 male hasnít signaled for 6 weeks now so he may have bit the dust as well (if a marked bird is predated and the carcass/PTT falls into the water or is buried in a burrow the signals cannot be detected by the satellites).

"Hornby Island Harlequin ducks (22 birds tagged March 2015)

"10 males are on the coast and they are well north of HI, with 2 birds as far north as SE Alaska. Some of these birds may actually winter at or near these locations but moved to HI for the herring spawn last March. However, itís possible that this molt migration is similar to that of the WR males and may indicate a general movement pattern to coastal areas with lower disturbance levels (or for some other reason).
"1 male is still in the Rockies and 2 have returned to HI.
"4 hens are nesting (3 in the Kootenays, 1 in the Rockies), 1 is on Cortez Island in the Salish Sea, and 1 has returned to HI.
"1 hen has definitely died on her breeding stream and another female and a male may have been predated since they havenít signaled for several weeks."



A later update (maps only) dated September 29 shows that at least one of the Hornby males who had  travelled to Alaska has come back to Hornby.
In general the Hornby birds seem to nest further east than predicted and some of the males take long detours on their return trip. To answer Jeav's post, most sea ducks spend the winter in flocks of various sizes but disperse to inland nesting sites in the spring. The males generally return first; the females return with the juveniles some weeks later. Studies are showing that many species return to the same nesting areas and the same wintering grounds year after year. But we're certainly seeing variations on that theme here.

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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #18 on: November 06, 2015, 08:48:20 PM »

This website shows the results of a similar study done on Barrow's Goldeneyes from 2006 to 2012.
Click on the various tabs at the top of the web page to see more information on that study.

http://www.sfu.ca/biology/wildberg/CWESeaducksfolder/BAGOwebpage/BAGOMigrationHome.html
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #19 on: November 06, 2015, 09:13:23 PM »

Another link Sean Boyd sent me to share.
This one describes yet another study of the same type, covering the Great Lakes and the Atlantic coast. Down the page you can learn more about how the birds are captured (I've helped out in some of that in a previous Harlequin study) and how the transmitters are implanted.

The site also has a lot of information about different species of sea ducks. There is also a great big list of recent studies, with links to a brief report of each. Lots of fascinating reading material here.

http://seaduckjv.org/science-resources/atlantic-and-great-lakes-sea-duck-migration-study/
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #20 on: November 06, 2015, 09:20:48 PM »

One more link... Foldi found an article about the Harlequin study in her local newspaper. Actually the reporter had contacted me, requesting the use of one of my photos of the duck with the transmitter; at the last minute they decided to use a photo of the study's author instead.
The article is on page 3, at this link: http://www.peacearchnews.com/eeditions/?iid=i20151106044718355
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NancyM
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« Post / Reply #21 on: November 07, 2015, 09:25:27 AM »

Many thanks for these links, wren! fascinating info.
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Tigerlady105
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« Post / Reply #22 on: November 07, 2015, 12:28:01 PM »

Very interesting, Wren.  Thank you for posting the information and links.   nod
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #23 on: January 10, 2016, 08:58:23 PM »

Eagle on Heron Rocks during our round-the-island seabird survey. The three ducks in the background are American Wigeons.

January 3, 11:21 am



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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #24 on: January 10, 2016, 09:01:59 PM »

There were two more adult eagles perched on top of Norris Rock, a little further offshore. Both had wet belly feathers.
This one has something clinging to his beak.

January 3, 11:37



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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #25 on: January 10, 2016, 09:11:14 PM »

On the rocks right below those eagles, hundreds of sea lions lounged. On our approach a few dozens took to the water; the rest remained on the rocks, minding their own business.

For a while the swimming ones jumped to and fro excitedly; then a group of them came to check us out.

When I'm in my kayak I don't stick around because all those large beasts make me nervous. But on the fish boat it felt safe to satisfy my curiosity. Obviously I was not the only curious one.

January 3, 11:35 am










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jeavverhey
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« Post / Reply #26 on: January 11, 2016, 06:26:59 AM »

That is awesome Wren! Curious like puppies!  Eyes like seals. Thanks for sharing such a neat experience with us.
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Cawatcher
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« Post / Reply #27 on: January 11, 2016, 11:08:28 AM »

Wonderful experience Winterwren, Thank you for sharing
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amazedbyeagles
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« Post / Reply #28 on: January 11, 2016, 11:22:11 AM »

So neat!  Yes, just like puppies!!!  Love the big brown liquid eyes!!!  Thanks for sharing! love
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boonibarb
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« Post / Reply #29 on: March 13, 2016, 11:34:56 AM »

 
february 25 2016 13:48 - cool Moss
 


february 25 2016 14:24 - Heron Rocks Eagle
 


Look at the reflection of the beak on the neck!
 

 

 

 
link to my fotos page - 
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/43214021@N08/
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