HEGPS - Our Nature Zone
January 22, 2018, 10:51:32 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Login Register Website Webcam Facebook  
collapse
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Nest #3 - 2014-2015 season  (Read 6032 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
winterwren
HEG
Friend of HEGPS
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,729


« on: March 13, 2015, 09:46:22 PM »

Nest #3 has always been a mystery to me. It was represented on Doug Carrick's original map. A few years ago, a neighbour described its location to me: right in the middle of a large private acreage that I do not have access to.

On last year's map of the eagle nests of Hornby Island, the last known location of Nest #3 is marked on the left side of the map, with a white pin, which means "status unknown." That's the story in a nutshell.



Nest #3, or a new nest in that territory, has probably been active all along but we had no firm data until two years ago. In February, 2013, I watched an eagle pair mating at the bottom of the Shire while the Shingle Spit eagles were already accounted for elsewhere. Then in early summer of the same year, Booni was sent to capture an injured male eagle in that area. The eagle had a brood patch, and unfortunately he had been electrocuted and did not survive. The males of Shingle Spit and Phipps Point were both accounted for. So in this sad way we confirmed our long suspicion that there is an active nest in #3 territory. We do not know if any offspring survived that year.

In the fall of 2013, after the eagles returned from the salmon runs, I spotted two eagles perched close, then dancing in the air together, the way mates do. This is our one indication that the female of that nest found herself a new mate. 

My many attempts to find this nest have been unsuccessful. There have been interesting adventures meanwhile, though. 

You can see last year's thread for this nest right here.
Logged
winterwren
HEG
Friend of HEGPS
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,729


« Post / Reply #1 on: March 13, 2015, 10:04:56 PM »

Today I worked on what I think is the boundary between this territory and the Shingle Spit eagles' stomping grounds (flapping grounds?) I heard a lot of eagle calls and the sea lions were quite loud, but I didn't have a chance to pay attention to the shore until my work was done.

Around 4 pm, then, I started on my way home, but soon screeched to a halt and backed up to where I had glimpsed two young eagles perched in a snag! The perch was partway down a tall bank, so the eagles weren't very high up from where I stood.

March 13, 4:02 pm



4:03



I got back to the truck and drove on... Only to slow right down again when I realised that the sky above me was full of eagles.
There must have been at least twenty, circling all around, landing in trees or taking off.

Then I stepped on the brakes and backed up again! Good thing there isn't much traffic!

I had spotted this tree!
4:07



I bushwacked to the edge of the bank, disturbing yet another eagle in his nap, and peeked down at the beach but all seemed quiet there. I looked for a source of food, a seal carcass maybe, but could see nothing. Nobody seemed to be feeding at that point.

It's too steep to get down to the beach in that area, so I decided to drive to Phipps Point and make my way back on the beach.

Logged
winterwren
HEG
Friend of HEGPS
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,729


« Post / Reply #2 on: March 13, 2015, 10:16:44 PM »

At Phipps Point there were a few eagles also, but the largest group was the one I had spotted from the road. The trees were dotted with white heads.

The tide was low, and I spotted two eagles by the water in the distance, but they were not feeding. No herring spawn either, and few sea birds.

From down here the treetop eagles were harder to photograph, but a few were sitting lower down. I was able to approach this one without making him fly away.
March 13, 4:30



I could see what looked like some whitish food remnant on his beak, but it's only when I looked at the pictures on the computer that I realised that he had fish scales sprinkled all over himself.
Herring have relatively large scales that detach easily.
This is what went on here!  And look at his crop...
4:31



4:32
Logged
winterwren
HEG
Friend of HEGPS
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,729


« Post / Reply #3 on: March 13, 2015, 10:30:01 PM »

I was now approaching, from below, the tree that had held the 5 eagles. Only three remained but the neighbouring trees were occupied also. There are 8 eagles in this picture. Click it to enlarge it.
March 13, 4:34



Another eagle low on a tree... Full enough not to care if I tiptoed closer.
I have to call this one a she, with that outstanding honker, elegantly ornamented with fish scales. All the eagles I saw had silvery scales stuck on their beak and feathers. The herring aren't coming in to spawn, but the eagles are getting a feed nonetheless.
4:36



4:37


Logged
jeavverhey
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 922


« Post / Reply #4 on: March 14, 2015, 03:53:33 AM »

Wonderful story and series of photos Wren - you live in paradise!  nod It is so fantastic that you can follow your dreams as you do. And thank you for sharing it with those of us who cannot.  Thank you
Logged
winterwren
HEG
Friend of HEGPS
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,729


« Post / Reply #5 on: March 14, 2015, 07:53:51 PM »

YW Jeav!

This afternoon I worked inside this territory again. It was much quieter, only a few visitors cruising by. I saw a pair of adult eagles flying close together, and then heard what sounded like good old healthy hanky-panky.

Yesterday the local eagles made no attempt to claim their territory. I suppose it would have been futile, given the crowd. But today they were calling out to some of the passing eagles, following rules that only eagles know.
Logged
OpieK
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 581



« Post / Reply #6 on: March 15, 2015, 12:31:32 AM »

amazing photos and story, ty Wren
Logged
Lifegard
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


« Post / Reply #7 on: March 15, 2015, 12:45:39 PM »

Thanks so much for your work Winterwren and Booni!  Your photos give the rest of us an intimate view of the eagles and trees etc. of Hornby Island.  You and the mods all remind me of public school teachers who aren't doing their jobs for the pay, but for the importance of their work as well as their tireless dedication.  Not that you actually get paid, LOL.  I appreciate all you do   thumbup

--Lifegard
Logged
winterwren
HEG
Friend of HEGPS
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,729


« Post / Reply #8 on: March 15, 2015, 11:58:47 PM »

Thank you for your kind words, Lifegard!
Logged
winterwren
HEG
Friend of HEGPS
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,729


« Post / Reply #9 on: March 29, 2015, 11:25:21 PM »

On March 21 I worked in this territory.  Most years, I can hear an eagle gulling from somewhere in the woods back from this spot (in the back of the Shire). This year I didn't hear any of those calls but some eagles were around for sure.


The first thing I heard, though, was a Peregrine Falcon!
The falcon was circling together with a young eagle, quite high up. Neither seemed to be chasing the other. I think they were simply sharing the thermal together.

Not very long after, I heard the other suspected nester in this area... A Red-tailed Hawk!
I soon spotted that bird... Carrying a small branch, and vocalizing.

March 21, 11:32 am



He circled around for several minutes; I glimpsed him between the trees but was not able to get a closer picture. Finally he disappeared toward the bluffs, a little further south than I had thought the nest to be.

Half an hour later he reappeared with another Red-tail! They circled briefly and disappeared again toward the bluffs, in the same direction as before.

Later I saw an adult eagle, a little further north. And than two Turkey Vultures. Also heard three kinds of woodpeckers, a Yellow-rumped Warbler, and a Barred Owl, this one quite close. What a wonderful area for birds!

Logged
winterwren
HEG
Friend of HEGPS
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,729


« Post / Reply #10 on: August 02, 2015, 10:00:46 PM »

On July 15, while eaglets everywhere were loud enough to be easily heard, I biked through this territory and loitered, hoping to hear something.

I did hear plenty...
Just not eagles.

A Phipps Point neighbour had told me that she had seen the Peregrines hunting in her yard with fledglings! This is apparently a yearly event.
On this day I heard loud calls between the road and the beach.
At least two very loud peregrines were perching just out of sight, and a third, silent one went to them from time to time. She flew so fast!
I followed them for half an hour and finally caught a photo of one, just before he took flight.
July 15, 12:28







Logged
winterwren
HEG
Friend of HEGPS
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,729


« Post / Reply #11 on: August 02, 2015, 10:09:55 PM »

While chasing around, hoping for a view of those peregrines, I also heard lots and lots of little chirps from the thickets by the road.
There were several families of Golden-crowned Kinglets - another fleet-winged critter.

I did get two clear photos here too: looks like a fledgling, with an improbable orange beak. Calling, with wings partly open and vibrating, like so many baby birds.
July 15, 112:37






Logged
Cawatcher
HEGPS
Member
*
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 8,423


« Post / Reply #12 on: August 02, 2015, 10:34:47 PM »

Beautiful fledgling?
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


* Theme Changer


Forum Default

Permanently

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
bisdakworldgreen design by jpacs29
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
SimplePortal 2.3.1 © 2008-2009, SimplePortal