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Author Topic: Olsen Farm Nest - 2014-2015 season  (Read 14823 times)
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #15 on: July 31, 2015, 10:16:51 PM »

Last night, July 30, I was in the Big Canoe and we went past this territory.

There was a huge continuous racket of screeps and calls.
At one point I saw one eaglet and one adult landing on the nest tree.
Most of the calls came from further east, just past the end of the fields.
Some of the screeps were not quit eagle-like. It was quite confusing... But I'm really thinking that part of the noise might be from the Red-tail Hawklets. They were still around and calling the day before. I think their voices blended with that of the eaglets, making this confusion of sounds.

One thing for sure, the Olsen Farm eaglets are no longer quiet!

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Cawatcher
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« Post / Reply #16 on: July 31, 2015, 10:24:40 PM »

 lol The Redtal Hawk fledglings get me every time wren. Many times I have scurried up a hill, lie in the brush and wait for movement .. To find it was a hawk fledgling calling constantly.
 How neat to hear both! 
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NancyM
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« Post / Reply #17 on: August 01, 2015, 01:15:49 PM »


I was taught that if I believe I am seeing a Semipalmated Sandpiper, I should look for other possible IDs, because although they often migrate through BC they are not common in this area. But a Sanderling would look larger than the other sandpipers, and definitely the bill is not a Western Sandpiper's. So I'm fairly positive that this is indeed a Semipalmated, my first one.

wren, I love the shorebirds but often (almost always, still) struggle with the identifications of the peeps. Another tip for ruling out Sanderlings is that they do not have a hind toe, only 3 forward-facing ones. The bird you were puzzling over clearly has a hind toe.

great photos!!
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #18 on: August 20, 2015, 11:07:35 PM »

Nancy, thank you for that. So many little things to learn about. I'm endlessly fascinated by the variety of small differences between species. It's slowly becoming clearer over time.
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