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Author Topic: Nest 6, 7 - Savoie Farm - 2014-2015 season  (Read 11039 times)
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #15 on: June 22, 2015, 10:20:04 PM »

On June 15 I paddled past this nest with Mr. Joyofdogs.
As we approached we could see two silhouettes on the nest.

We found an angle with better light and were able to confirm that there are indeed two eaglets on this nest!

Photos will follow when I have a chance to catch up.
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #16 on: June 27, 2015, 05:47:04 PM »

Photos from June 15, taken from the water...
2 eaglets on the nest!

June 15, 8:09 pm



Different angle... It's easier to tell here that the nest is at the top of the tree.
8:15



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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #17 on: August 20, 2015, 06:44:59 PM »

Lately from certain angles it looks to me as if there is less to this nest than there used to be... But maybe it's all in my head.

On August 10 I took this photo from a distance. Looks pretty good from this angle.
What I didn't realise until I looked at the photo in full size is that there is an eaglet on the nest.
Click the picture... We just see the back.
August 10, 4:27 pm



On the point itself, the rocks are full of newcomers!
Black Turnstones, Surfbirds, and some Black-bellied Plovers, some of which are still in breeding colours! They look so different from the winter birds.
I'm thinking that these birds must have just arrived from a long flight. Usually shore birds sleep standing on one leg with the head tucked backwards into the scapular feathers. Some of these are sitting right on their bellies. I had never seen this before. They must be really bagged.
4:36 pm



This I think is a juvenile Black-bellied Plover. Out like a light.




Here are some more Black-bellied Plovers flying in. Looks like the adults are all moulting their flight feathers.
There's also a tiny little sandpiper among them! Later I saw some Westerns and some Least Sandpipers, so it might be one of those.
4:41




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MaggiesMom
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« Post / Reply #18 on: August 20, 2015, 07:39:34 PM »

weird - I kept thinking the nest was midway up that tree - until I looked back at your June post and realized it was way up at the top!
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"If you slow things down, you notice things you hadn't seen before." - Robert Wilson, director, author, videographer
winterwren
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« Post / Reply #19 on: August 20, 2015, 10:20:42 PM »

Maggies, and I kept thinking that it occupied the whole top and was bigger.
A tricky nest.
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #20 on: August 20, 2015, 10:25:34 PM »

So meanwhile I'm still spying on the Black-bellied Plovers.
Here's one in full breeding plumage - so different!
August 10, 5:01 pm



Here are some more, all in different stages of moult. I think that's a Mew Gull with them: yellow legs, but not as large as the Californias.




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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #21 on: August 20, 2015, 10:33:52 PM »

This is when I hear screeps again.
The eaglet is on the move!
August 10, 5:04 pm







Two minutes later he takes off again, still calling.
5:06










I didn't see the second eaglet or the parents on this visit.


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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #22 on: August 20, 2015, 11:08:40 PM »

I can hear some resident Killdeers on shore... I've been learning (here, for instance) that migrating shore birds often stop among them. So I went over to check that out.

So glad I did! Nearby were these beauties.
They are juvenile Western Sandpipers. Like many shore birds, they migrate separately from their parents. They have never done this before. Nobody has shown them the way. And yet here they are, thousands of miles from their hatch place in northern Alaska.
August 10, 5:15 pm



Look at their beautiful semipalmated feet.











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Cawatcher
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« Post / Reply #23 on: August 21, 2015, 07:13:18 AM »

nice series Winterwren I especially like the precarious perch the young eagle picked
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amazedbyeagles
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« Post / Reply #24 on: August 21, 2015, 08:26:15 AM »

Wonderful photos, Wren, of those beautiful tiny birds!  How fascinating that they have the info imprinted in their brains of how to migrate and where to go!  Thanks for sharing! :-) love
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #25 on: August 21, 2015, 09:50:00 PM »

Shortly after I quietly paddled away from those Western Sandpipers, I saw a few shore birds flying around and worried that I had made them fly despite my precautions.
But they circled and flew toward me...

August 10, 5:23 



Different birds! These are even smaller: Lesser Sandpipers. I'm starting to see the difference in bill shapes, after a couple of years of confusion. These ones have a slightly downcurved bill like the Westerns, but it's much finer and pointier.
Plus they have yellowish legs. And a small hind toe, Nancy? I'm trying to notice that now.
Funny how different they look from one another on this next photo, just from their stance.
5:29 



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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #26 on: August 28, 2015, 09:56:27 PM »

Another outing in this territory on August 16 . No eagles visible this time.

A few Harlequins, still the ones who stayed over the summer I think. The new arrivals will be more numerous and the adults will moult their flight feathers right away.
August 16, 7:31 pm



The flock of Black-bellied Plovers I had seen a few days before has moved on. Only one plover now, moulting like his conspecifics. They seem to be doing that while in transit. Amazing.
7:41



Among the Turnstones, a surprise: two Greater Yellowlegs, sitting right down on their bellies! They too usually sleep standing on one long leg.
7:43



One of the Turnstones is fast asleep on his belly too. The Yellowlegs haven't gotten up but they know I'm there.




Ok, time to leave them alone before I make them fly off.

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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #27 on: August 28, 2015, 10:26:46 PM »

Closer to shore, another Greater Yellowlegs.
This one is moulting for sure. I'm a little confused about who moults when, but the winter feathers are the paler grey ones. The mix of pale and dark feathers looks like a patchwork jacket.
August 16, 7:49






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Cawatcher
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« Post / Reply #28 on: August 29, 2015, 01:00:26 PM »

These birds look so dainty thank you winterwren
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boonibarb
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« Post / Reply #29 on: October 01, 2015, 12:39:36 PM »

 
Well, i heard something sad on tuesday.
People who live near this Nest had been away, & noticed when they came back that part of the Nest had come down & there was a dead Eaglet in with all the sticks!
june 15 wren had photographed two Eaglets on the Nest.
Then, on august 10, she was puzzled, thinking the Nest looked smaller that day, than she remembered.
An accurate observation!
i want to try to understand what happened to this poor Eaglet.
They had made it well along towards fledging, yet this one died & the other didn*t.
We will never know, but what a sadness.
Yesterday i was shown where the Eaglet was found.

In the middle, is the lovely head.
To the left is the back feathering, lower right corner is the left wing, upper left corner is the tail.
There were only feathers & bones left.

september 30 2015 14:47 - Savoie Nest Eaglet remains



Darn, eh?
Wish we could have rescued this poor youngster.



Underside of tail & petticoat down feathers.
The tail was a bit short, & the feather bases were sheathed & still growing.
You can see the tassels on the ends of the feathers.



Lovely tassels on the secondary feather tips.



Left wing & back feathers.
The feathers are all very healthy, so food was good.
There are a few small feathers in there that have steady hunger bars on them, so food was short, when they were growing, yet food was very good looking during the growth of the larger flight feathers.
Perhaps this youngster died in the fall?



link to my fotos page -  
 
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