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Author Topic: Nest #6, 7, Savoie Farm, 2013-2014 Season  (Read 11475 times)
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winterwren
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« on: March 07, 2014, 10:20:03 PM »

This topic is for photos and discussions about Nest 6-7.

Here's the map of the eagle nests of the island. Nest 6-7 is at the top of the map.  There is a small remnant of a previous nest in a neighbouring tree, so this is why this nest came to have two numbers!



Last year this nest produced one eaglet.
In 2012, we were unable to monitor this nest at the time when the eaglets would have been visible, so we don't have any data, except that there was at least a nesting attempt. The eagles were still occupying and defending this territory on May 11. We have no information about what happened after that.
In 2011, this nest produced two healthy eaglets.


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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #1 on: March 07, 2014, 10:35:27 PM »

The herring have arrived!
This morning, March 7, we could see the turquoise colour of the herring milt from the cam, all the way to Tralee Point.
I heard that there was also some spawning near Whaling Station Bay.

I launched my kayak at Grassy Point and paddled past the Nest #9 territory. There was some of that beautiful turquoise near the shore all the way.
As I approached this territory, there was an interruption in the turquoise colour. It started again at Collishaw Point, and the point was covered with gulls.

The turquoise colour was spreading. I paddled to the shallows near the nest, outside the opaque turquoise milt. I looked down and saw hundreds of fish below me!

The fish were circling to the shore and back in waves. There would have been thousands in the area.

I tried different settings on my camera and managed to catch a few photos. The shape of the fish is distorted by the water. Each fish is between 7 and 10 inches long.
I sat there mesmerized for a really long time.

Click on the pictures for a better view. 1:08 pm



12:27



12:30


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Sandor3
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« Post / Reply #2 on: March 07, 2014, 11:05:50 PM »

Thanks for posting these amazing photos, winterwren.  It has to be an amazing feeling to look in to the water and see so many fish.  The colour on the camera today was certainly a sight, too!   thumbup
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« Post / Reply #3 on: March 08, 2014, 07:27:41 AM »

Awesome pictures. Thank you for posting.  thumbup
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wildkitten
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« Post / Reply #4 on: March 09, 2014, 11:04:34 AM »

Very cool, Wrennie! That's a LOT of feeesh.....Sure miss you!!  WK
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #5 on: March 10, 2014, 10:13:03 PM »

Here are more photos I took near Nest 6-7 on March 7, the first day of the herring spawn...

Just past the nest tree, wall-to-wall gulls on Collishaw Point.
March 7, 11:20



There were three eagles on Collishaw Point. Here's one of them. His petticoat feathers are soaking wet.
11:25



This, on the other hand, may be Mom and Dad Savoie. They were trilling from time to time, and I was pretty sure I could recognize Mom Savoie's strange accent.
11:45


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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #6 on: March 10, 2014, 10:27:05 PM »

Meanwhile the turquoise colour of the herring milt was spreading. The water became milky where the fish were densest, handily hiding the herring from their predators. You could see fish jumping clear our of the water from time to time. And eagles, gulls and otters were still catching some when their full bellies allowed them to move.

How to translate that luminous turquoise colour? I tried different ways.

A shot while black clouds darkened the day.
March 7, 11:48



Here, the horizon still dark, the foreground lightening again.




Still trying to convey that luminous tropical colour, I noticed how strongly the turquoise reflected on the flying gulls and started playing with that.







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Donnae
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« Post / Reply #7 on: March 11, 2014, 09:11:12 AM »

Just super great photos Wren, makes you feel that you are right there.  Thanks so much for taking them.
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OpieK
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« Post / Reply #8 on: March 11, 2014, 11:58:34 AM »

love the aquamarine gulls!
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #9 on: March 11, 2014, 08:45:34 PM »

Mrs Bufflehead at the edge of the turquoise colour...

March 7, 11:49



11:50
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NancyM
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« Post / Reply #10 on: March 11, 2014, 10:05:56 PM »

how lovely!  (wish I was there)
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amazedbyeagles
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« Post / Reply #11 on: March 12, 2014, 03:45:02 PM »

Beautiful!  Beautiful!  Love the reflected color on the gulls underwings!  Thank you so much for sharing! love
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luvthebirds
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« Post / Reply #12 on: April 18, 2014, 09:30:12 PM »

snip

Just past the nest tree, wall-to-wall gulls on Collishaw Point.
March 7, 11:20


snip


OMG, Wren.  I am in love with this photo.  Cannot find the words to describe how it affects me... very beautiful and moving.  Thank you for sharing.
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Nurture yourself with Nature - luvthebirds
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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #13 on: April 30, 2014, 08:58:32 PM »

Thanks Luv!  heart

Today i went for a paddle at low tide, past this territory, and poked around Collishaw Point. I took several photos of the nest from different angles and I have yet to examine them in large size to make sure, but with binoculars I couldn't see anyone in the nest. On our return there was a pair of eagles in a nearby tree. They both flew off to defend the territory when a third adult flew by. But at no time did either of them go to the nest.

Mind you it was the first really warm day; would it have been warm enough to leave eggs, or even freshly-hatched eaglets, alone for half an hour or more?
 puzzled

So I'm really not sure about the status of this nest.

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winterwren
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« Post / Reply #14 on: May 11, 2014, 11:08:56 PM »

On April 30 I paddled around this nest's territory again. On the way over I took pictures of the nest from various angles again, and still could not see anyone in it.

I was after some strange, wild-sounding calls that I could hear from way off shore. The seabirds were mere specks in the distance, and, as often, they did not let us approach... The calls turn out to have been from Long-tailed Ducks, well over a hundred scattered on the horizon, only a few of whom show up in this photo. The big surprise is the large number of Horned Grebes in breeding plumage! All gathering for migration, I'm guessing. Click on the picture to see them better.
Collishaw Point, April 30, 2:27 pm


Click here to find a sound clip similar to what we heard... Multiply that sound by a hundred or so... Far away, but that sound carries!


We dawdled around in the shallows, following the shore of Collishaw Point way out to its outer reefs, now exposed by the low tide. Tribes of seals lounged on the rocks. Behind them the dark spots are those elusive seabirds.
2:30



On our approach the seals dived in the water, but as usual they didn't go far. They were as curious about us as we were about them.




Here are some of those Long-tailed Ducks flying off!
In the water you can see the heads of all those seals, swimming around and watching us.




Watching us from very close, some of them.



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