Author Topic: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!  (Read 79672 times)

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Offline gzebear

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #45 on: June 20, 2012, 03:11:43 PM »
Thank you, Chop! and thank you, Cascades! and the other six courageous organizations! I wish it was a list of thousands, but every effort counts toward the ultimate goal of a lead-free environment.  :heart :heart :heart

Offline gzebear

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #46 on: July 20, 2012, 07:19:51 AM »
Maine just lost two more beautiful full-plumage Loons to lead fishing tackle. One of them came to us last week DOA. No emoticon conveys the emotion.

Offline gzebear

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #47 on: September 19, 2012, 08:03:35 AM »
 Nova Scotia Federation of Anglers and Hunters saves lives by taking a stand against lead ammo:

http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/136664-hunters-federation-takes-aim-at-lead-ammunition


Offline birdvoyer

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #48 on: September 19, 2012, 08:18:25 AM »
 :woohoo It's a start! Awareness is the first step. TY gzebear.
"No one cares how much you know, until they know how much you care."

Offline mishikeenhquay

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #49 on: September 19, 2012, 08:52:27 AM »


Gze:  Gitchi Miigwetch for all the wonderful lessons you teach...and things you do!
"Our true enemies, as well as our true sources of strength, lie within."

Offline gzebear

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #50 on: September 21, 2012, 03:02:25 AM »
Not far from where I live, the Damariscotta Lake Watershed Association is working hard to get/keep the lead out of Damariscotta Lake. They now have a lead tackle exchange program:

                http://www.dlwa.org/leadexchange.html

They have also created a simple but excellent slide show on the effects of lead:

                http://www.dlwa.org/UnleadedLoonsSlides.pdf

It is a terrible thing to watch a beautiful loon die from lead poisoning. One small sinker will do it. We try so hard to save them, but usually by the time they are found they are too far gone.

 :sigh

Offline boodle317

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #51 on: November 03, 2012, 07:31:41 AM »
Please take a moment and get involved.  Providing you zip code with your signature gets your letter to your particular representatives.  Thank you!

http://action.biologicaldiversity.org/o/2167/t/5243/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=10065#.UJUkyLEfySo.facebook

Offline Faerie Gardener

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #52 on: November 03, 2012, 01:16:09 PM »
Signed and shared!!  Thanks Boo
"In all things of Nature there is something of the Marvelous"  -Aristotle

"A garden is never as good as it will be next year" -Anon

Offline emc

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #53 on: December 02, 2012, 10:43:03 AM »
Bringing forward the lists of non lead alternatives and exchange programs.

This is a list of non-lead ammunition. It is quite extensive.

http://www.azgfd.gov/w_c/documents/non-leadrifleammolist2011.doc

And a non-lead brochure.

http://www.azgfd.gov/pdfs/w_c/condors/nonlead_brochure.pdf

Both found on the Condor Recovery Site. Condors have been affected greatly by lead also.

http://www.azgfd.gov/w_c/california_condor.shtml


Found a  couple of PDF file lists of non lead fishing tackle sources.

http://www.northland.edu/assets/files/SOEI/LoonWatch/Non-leadFishingTackleSuppliers_8_08.pdf

http://www.glrppr.org/docs/non-lead-tackle-suppliers.pdf

Some specific types mentioned, plus another source

http://www.leadfreefishingtackle.com/

Recycle programs:

The Damariscotta Lake Watershed Association in Maine is working hard to get/keep the lead out of Damariscotta Lake. They now have a lead tackle exchange program:

                http://www.dlwa.org/leadexchange.html

Anglers can swap old lead tackle for Loon-safe alternatives through Maineís Soil and Water Conservation District Lead Fishing Tackle Exchange Program. Contact information for participating counties can be found at www.mainewcds.org.







beth
from California

Offline ccfan

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #54 on: December 02, 2012, 04:50:01 PM »
signed also
There is grace afoot in this world and it will find you.

Offline emc

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #55 on: December 18, 2012, 12:16:47 PM »
Do we have this info here?

A great site by SOAR. Very well done

Lots of info on lead free hunting what lead does.

I like the positive way it treats hunters. If you want their help to make changes, this is the way to go.( This is not about trophy hunting, many people still hunt to feed their families)

:thumbup:

http://www.soarraptors.org/HuntLeadFree.html

Some excerpts:

Hunting Lead-Free & Saving Wildlife

At this time in Iowa, waterfowl hunters must use US Fish & Wildlife Service approved non-toxic/non-lead shot. Many state and county areas also require non-toxic/non-lead shot for all hunting. In many situations, however, pheasant, turkey, rabbit, and deer hunters are still allowed to use lead ammunition. SOAR encourages all hunters and firearms shooters to "go lead free" for wildlife and human health.

In November 2010, SOAR was awarded a Resource Enhancement and Protection Conservation Education Program (REAP-CEP) grant to develop educational materials for the Iowa Hunter Education Program outlining the toxic effects of lead and the current research on lead's impact on the environment. A committee of hunter education instructors, DNR law enforcement and wildlife bureau staff, wildlife and conservation groups, SOAR volunteers, and concerned citizens reviewed text and provided feedback.

See the "Hunting Lead-Free" brochure. Download a screen-quality PDF.

If you would like to download a press-quality PDF (2,680 kb with printer's marks) for printing and sharing with your group, please contact SOAR. This handout is 4.25x11 inches double-sided.

This version of the "Hunting Lead-Free" handout has the same info but is 8.5x11 inches one-sided and *should* print on home printers, but would be able to printed at your local copy and print shop.

Below is the text of the brochure with research and informational citations included in boxes.
( excerpts only)
What the links are:

Some links are to agency websites or documents about lead, how lead affects animals and people, or the impacts of lead
Some links are scientific papers written by wildlife biologists, veterinarians, pathologists, epidemiologists, wildlife rehabilitators, medical doctors, and others.
Before these papers can be accepted for publication in scientific journals or other publications, each was put through a rigorous review process where the editors of the journal send the paper to other scholars in the same field for their opinion on the relevance to the field, appropriateness for that journal, and the quality and completeness of the science.

These papers are not always easy to read because the language used is that of the particular scientific field. Each paper has an abstract or summary near the top. Read this. If you read on, and come across a scientific term you're not sure about, visit this website that provides definitions to scientific terms from several sources.

Hunting Lead Free & Saving Wildlife

People who hunt:

love being outside,
are interested in wildlife,
support wildlife research and habitat conservation through license fees, and
are problem-solvers.
Wildlife needs huntersí help.

Over 130 different species of wildlife have been impacted by eating lead. 

Wildlife Impacted by Lead:

Species Documented as Ingesting or Poisoned by Lead Shot (18 KB PDF)
Evidence of Lead Shot Problems in Wildlife - Minnesota DNR literature review (143 KB PDF)
SOAR's Rehabilitating Birds with Lead Exposure page


Upland birds and waterfowl, like pheasants and ducks, mistake lead shot for seeds or grit and eat it.

Scavengers, like eagles and hawks, can be exposed to lead when eating from a game animal carcass or gut pile.

Ingesting lead is harmful to wild animals.

An eagle can die from eating a very small fragment of a lead slug or rifle bullet.
A duck can die from eating 1-2 pieces of lead shot.
Lead can affect an animalís ability to find food, hide from predators, and fight off diseases.

Ingesting lead is harmful to people.

Some packages of venison from deer shot with lead rifle bullets contained more than 100 ppm lead. Items with 100 ppm lead or above are considered hazardous waste by the Environmental Protection Agency. Some venison from deer shot with lead slugs contained 0.7 ppm lead. This venison would not meet the standards for export to Europe or China. Image © Cornatzer and Fogarty

Lead fragments have been found in deer meat.
Your body takes in lead and stores it like eating wildlife killed with lead ammunition (147 KB PDF)
Lead exposure and educational proficiency: moderate lead exposure and educational proficiency on end-of-grade examinations (514 KB PDF) most at risk.
Even very low levels of lead can cause learning and attention deficit disorders.
Lead affects the nervous system the most.

There are several types of bullets, slugs, and shot being made from non-lead/non-toxic products.

Waterfowl hunters have already switched to using non-toxic shot.  This has saved millions of ducks from lead poisoning.  This is cost-effective conservation.

The switch:

Simply removing lead from waterfowl hunting has helped to make duck populations more robust and this conservation measure insured manufacturers a market for non-toxic shot, allowing them to invest in development, re-tooling, and marketing. There are now a wide assortment of non-toxic shot types to choose from and waterfowl hunters are still enjoying their time in the field. Does the ban on lead shot save waterfowl? (303 KB PDF)
Concerned about lead poisoning? 
Hereís what you can do!

Spread the word, talk to your friends about lead.

Do some research.

For more information about lead, visit:

SOAR's Lead in the Environment page
Environmental Protection Agency
Centers for Disease Control
Department of Health and Human Services, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Iowa Department of Public Health Bureau of Lead Poisoning Prevention
Test it out! 

Non-toxic shot comes in steel and combinations of other metals (see: US Fish & Wildlife Service listing of approved shot types).
Knowing how your shotgun patterns with different shot and at different distances is the key to success!
Rifle bullets and shotgun slugs are made from solid copper.
Make sure to sight in your firearm using the copper slugs or bullets.
Links to help you test it out!

Wildfowling Magazine International discussion about patterning your shotgun
Check out Iowa DNR CONSEP (Cooperative North American Shotgun Education Program) workshops that are designed to educator hunters to become more effective wiing shooters
 

If you canít find non-lead ammunition at your local store, ask them to stock some. Increased demand brings down prices. Watch for sales during the off-season.

Using copper bullets and slugs and non toxic shot saves wildlife and helps humans. You can help the environment and make great hunting memories for you and your family.

Links to Non-toxic Ammo & Info:




Please look it over and see how we can help
beth
from California

Offline beans

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #56 on: January 05, 2013, 12:37:02 PM »
A Golden Eagle suffers from lead poisoning after eating a deer carcass.  The deer was shot with lead bullets.  Happily the eagle was rescued and is recuperating at a wildlife center.

Read the story here:

http://lacrossetribune.com/news/local/state-and-regional/poison-ammo-eagle-rescue-sparks-debate-on-lead-bullets/article_69b6ee7c-56fd-11e2-8a1a-0019bb2963f4.html
Jean, California

Offline gzebear

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #57 on: January 05, 2013, 04:06:15 PM »
Being rescued is one thing. Surviving is another. Getting released back to the wild after lead poisoning is, in my albeit limited experience, a long shot, especially "severe lead poisoning" as in this case. It will be interesting to follow this Golden Eagle and see how he/she fares. It appears the eagle is now being treated at REGI.

Offline gzebear

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #58 on: January 07, 2013, 04:17:31 AM »

A turkey vulture with a high lead level was brought to The Wildlife Center of Virginia on December 28 with four pieces of lead still in the stomach. Here is her story so far:

          http://wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/current-patients/turkey-vulture-12-2667

I had seen this video and while searching to find it again, came across some sites that reported findings of intentional lead poisoning of turkey vultures ... you know, just to see what would happen: http://www.jwildlifedis.org/content/39/1/96.full.pdf


Offline gzebear

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Re: GTLO - Get the Lead Out!
« Reply #59 on: January 07, 2013, 05:14:50 PM »


I posted under Avian Haven the story of our most recent episode of lead poisoning:
 http://www.ournaturezone.com/index.php?topic=895.msg124793#msg124793