HEGPS ~ Our Nature Zone

Ways To Help Wildlife => Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation => Topic started by: gmadeb3 on October 24, 2019, 09:13:12 AM

Title: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on October 24, 2019, 09:13:12 AM
Finding an injured Raptor, we have a network of volunteers to assist in getting it to the Rehab Center.  I am one of those stations. 
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on October 24, 2019, 07:24:30 PM
Things are pretty busy these days here.  Not sure if it is because of harvest or the weather (we have had really windy days).  I have had a transport or assist with a relay every day this week.  It started on Sunday with a Turkey Vulture and then later that evening a screech owl was hit by a vehicle.  Monday I left for the rehab center with the 2 birds.  It takes about 90 minutes to drive there and I usually help get them checked in with weight and checked over.  Then Tuesday a person from out in the panhandle of our state brought a female bald eagle and a second bird was a Merlin (he drove 6 hours to get them to me).  I took off right away and drove the trip again to the rehab center.  The bald eagle was found by her dead mate, she was checked for lead poisoning and was positive.  So glad we got her there so fast, hoping for the best.  The merlin was just really thin so some nice meals and hope he will be out soon.  Wednesday comes and now a call about an osprey and a red tail hawk. After work I met another transporter and after checking on the osprey I decided the wing that was broken was so bad that I called another transporter and she met me about 50 miles from my place and she took it back to the center to have better care done.  Now today another call with a Great Horned Owl that was struck by a vehicle and another broken wing.  My wrapping skills are a challenge when you have these strong talons trying to get you.  So for now he is all quiet, tomorrow another trip BUT I can bring back one GHO that is ready to be released.  I will hand it over to another driver who can take it back to the area it was picked up from.


Here is the Eagle being transported.


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48955623141_2e9afba131_b.jpg)

The GHO with the wing fracture

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48955733837_6205dfb61f_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: winterwren on October 25, 2019, 12:02:53 AM
Thanks for starting that new topic, Deb! It's interesting for me to learn this aspect of what you do.

Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on October 25, 2019, 04:47:28 PM
Another day and another transport.  Early this morning I got a message that there was a  bird from out west that was really close and if I could meet them I could take both the birds to the center.  So off about 30 miles west and I got the bird.  Now off we go to the rehab center.  The funny part of this is,  the gal thought the hawk was a rough-legged hawk, i peeked in the box and nope.  Rough-leggeds have feathers down their legs and this one didn't,  so now what is this bird?
 I can't wait to get there and get a better look and find out what it is.  As soon as the director sees the bird she knows it is a bird that we rarely see.  It is a Northern Goshawk.  We have only had 5 others recorded in the rehab in 42 years.  So we took some nice photos for ID purposes.  The Great Horned Owl had a broken wing and the other was a dislocated elbow (which is not good).  We wrapped it up and put it in a quiet place for now.  Will get the vet to look at it later.  So now it is time to leave for home.  I get on the road and I get a message, a guy hit a hawk right outside of my home town.  He got out and saw it in the ditch and it was alive.  So I drive home and find it in the ditch with a fracture of a wing.  Tomorrow it will get a ride to the center, I am done for the day.


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48959643167_1a9ee8b215_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48959643362_a8f7baee4b_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48958904433_46edea52fe_b.jpg)
nice long toes for bird catching

Here is the red tail when found

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48958909663_6c6ffa6ece_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48959461401_deebbe6031_b.jpg)

pretty fierce even though it was hurt

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48959648292_3706b97bd9_b.jpg)

(http://)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on October 25, 2019, 08:54:26 PM
Here is a little info and explanation of how our rehab relay transport works.  This is the map of our state and I have put a red dot where I live and another red dot where the Rehab center is.  My town is very close to our interstate that runs through our state, it is easy for me to help out with the transfers.  All birds found in the state have to travel to the rehab center on the east side of Lincoln.  It is 455 miles across the state.  If a bird is found anywhere in the state it needs to travel to the rehab center.  That means lots of miles so we have a relay system set up with volunteers across the state, like ambulance drivers we drive and transfer the bird to others to get the bird to the rehab center as soon as possible. Of course when a bird is ready for release we need to reverse the drive so we can get it back to the area it was picked up.  This is a team effort, some people are only transporters and some are able to take care of the bird for a short time with food or initial treatment.  We have a state number that can be called and then the closest person to the area will get the info to go find the bird.  Of course sheriffs and game and parks officers get calls but they are not able to do the transfers.  Transports all have to be on the permit to have a raptor with them.  So that is a brief explanation of how our system works.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48960177713_734d37c599_o.jpg)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on October 27, 2019, 03:27:56 PM
There is no better feeling than to have the opportunity to release a raptor back to the wild. On this day I got a male Red-tail Hawk that was to get his freedom back.  It hasn't been easy,  he had a chance at freedom the middle of July but he just couldn't fly well then so I was able to get him back to rehab for some more observation and some more time for some of his feathers to be come in.  Now here we are the end of Oct and he is finally ready.  Even though it was windy and cold, I know he was ready for his chance to fly.  I got him out and he looked around and he was ready.  I had a friend come and share in this great moment,  she took the photos and shared them with me.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48969902958_f679f7d7a5_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48969903008_217a73aaff_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48970448401_2649548b45_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48970621852_1d1200a373_b.jpg)


You can see his band,  all raptors have a band placed on them here. 
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48969903123_397041c771_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on October 27, 2019, 04:56:11 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqS87Q-VBDc
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on October 31, 2019, 07:45:03 PM
Vehicles that hit raptors are common unfortunately -  they are eating road kill along side of the road and can't get away fast enough from a speeding car or truck.  This Great Horned Owl got hit and seems to have an issue with the one eye and is not standing well.  Off to the rehab center tomorrow.  It was given some drops to the eye and pain meds.  Lets hope time will heal it.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48993939206_4b35a58f67_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on November 04, 2019, 06:17:13 AM
Just a small update on the bald eagle that had lead poisoning.  She  finished her second round of therapy Sunday.  There will be a blood draw today or tomorrow.  She has become a feisty lady,  eating and drinking.  So we hope she continues on her recovery to freedom.  The fast transport to rehab has probably saved her.
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on November 16, 2019, 09:33:51 PM
Great News on the female bald eagle,  she is ready to be released.  The rehab center is working on finding transport for her so she can be released back in the area she was found.  The mentioned the quick response to the center and getting medicine had saved her life.  So happy we had a good outcome for her,  not always so lucky.  Lets remember "Get the Lead Out"
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on November 16, 2019, 10:06:21 PM
Seems things come in waves,  haven't had a call for a bit and then with in a couple of hours I get 2.  The first was from a man that had picked up a bird that had struck the window of a building.  He thought it was a Prairie Falcon,  it seemed stunned from the impact but he didn't think anything was broken.  When I got home I thought I would call and see if I could come and get it from him that evening because I had just got a call about a nest of young Barn Owlets that needed to get to the center the next day.  So I headed out for a 30 min drive to get the first bird.  I arrived and he takes me to the bird which he had secured in a box.  I opened the  lid to see it was not a Prairie Falcon but a small hawk, Sharp-shinned  to be exact.  Its right eye seemed a bit more closed probably from hitting the window.  So now back home and I am able to give it a small pain med and a little water,  kept in a nice quiet and dark place.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49077167766_89c926bdb8_b.jpg)

Now I am home and the man with the barn owlets calls and tells me that he had been checking on this deer blind that had a nest with 7 owlets since the first part of October but had noticed that the week before he didn't seen all of them.  He checked again a couple of days later and he knew that a couple had died.  He decided to put in a couple of duck carcasses for them to eat on because he thought maybe the parents had left.  So when he checked on them Thursday he could only see 2 and was afraid one was really weak.  I told him that I could come up early Friday afternoon but if he could please go out first thing in the morning and capture them and take them to a warm place till I got there.  He called me Friday morning and he had 3 the other 4 like we thought had died.  No sign of the parents, so maybe the cold weather we had was too much for them and they left to go South.  Barn Owls migrate out of the area for the winter and come back in the Spring,  this is also very unusual to have young at this time of the year.  Well I got the 3 and gave them some hydration right away and then took off for home.  Now I need to see about getting them to the rehab center.  They can eat at least 5 mice apiece each night,  so if you have a mouse problem consider getting a Barn Owl family..........   I found another transporter that would meet me that night.  They are safe and doing well now at the center.  Here are a few pictures of them.  I think they would have fledged very soon,  one seemed to have a bit more fluffies still on its back.


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49076637953_27e6781a0a_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49077372617_022ed2b94a_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49077372622_6e52fbc61b_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49076638018_c952782d8b_b.jpg)



Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: jeavverhey on November 18, 2019, 06:18:08 AM
Thanks for what you do Deb. The world needs more like you. :eclove
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on November 19, 2019, 06:20:20 AM
Oct was a very busy month,  usually not that many calls for me.  I have to keep track of miles and hours logged in hands on care.  As a volunteer the Rehab center keeps track of all the hours and minutes that everyone across the state has.  So my miles added up to 1,180 and my hours were 225.  This month has not been as busy (so far)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on November 21, 2019, 07:14:21 PM
Well today was a great day............  We got all our ducks in a row  :duck,  arranging transportation for birds to travel across our state takes some time.  To start with the female bald eagle brought into rehab towards the end of October with lead poisoning had recovered and was ready to go back to her territory.  I had helped with that transport and now I get to help with her going back to freedom.  Made arrangements with another transporter to meet me in my home town.  He was going to drive during the night about 5 hours west to her territory and wait for sunrise.  I did a little smudge with her tonight before I  transferred her to the next transporter.
 I wished her safe travels and told her she is strong and well again because of some fine people who cared so much for her, told her to find another handsome male and continue with a wonderful life. 

I got to the rehab center just as they were getting her band on her leg.  She seemed to know this was the first step to being free.


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49102641506_3df52c9dc5_b.jpg)

this is one fine looking Eagle,  what a foot and look at those talons
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49102833802_aab4a293d5_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49102129078_a222b0e88e_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49102169873_082e0137cf_b.jpg)

on the road and I can see the nice big box in my rear view mirror
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on November 21, 2019, 08:00:08 PM
There was a second passenger in my car today,  not very big that is for sure.  It was an Eastern Screech Owl,  I had picked it up last month at a place just on the edge of my town.  The person found it laying by the door as she was entering the building for work.  Nothing seemed broken but it did seem to have some head trauma.  So I kept it in a nice quiet, warm place and transferred it to the rehab center.  Amazing that today both birds that I had helped with were ready to be set free.
 For the owl it was good I got home just as it was getting dark which is perfect timing to let an owl go.


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49102833832_9bb21d1821_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49102681221_c29beb5718_b.jpg)
in my car that big box is where the eagle is  :ecsmile

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49102681216_23e80fed05_b.jpg)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3pIPi3tdSg
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on November 25, 2019, 09:05:54 PM
On Sunday I had time to go birding, so I got away for a bit but then I got a message that there was a hawk by a church that couldn't fly.  Of course when they told me where I couldn't believe it......... right in my home town and about a 1/2 mile from my place.  The issue was I was 30 miles away,   I sent my husband with a box and a towel.  Hope he can at least cover the bird till I get there.  I get into town and my hubby has the bird in the box at our house.  I was able to get a look at it,  right off you can see it is an adult Red Tail because it has a full red tail.  I checked the wings and it had a small bloody area on the wrist of the right wing, there seemed to be a fracture there.  The other wing was ok.  I checked our transporter site to see if there was someone traveling by my place.  Dang I had missed the ride, so I put a message out that I had a bird that needed a ride.  A gal from Lincoln said she could meet me and she would take the bird to the center.  So now I only had to drive 30 miles to meet her and then she would take it to the center.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49125775396_432f92f06a_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49125961197_ed2223186d_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on December 04, 2019, 09:45:33 PM
This week the  weather  has turned out really nice,  that means an opportunity to release some raptors.  Back in October I had rescued a Red Tail that had been hit along a country road, she healed and was ready to be released.  The second was a youngster which was also ready for release.    Wednesday is our after school program so it was a great opportunity to have the kids join me in releasing the birds. 

Here is the Red Tail today
 


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49171185468_c47439cbc6_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48959648292_3706b97bd9_b.jpg)
This is the Red Tail after I picked her up on Oct 25th


For the young Red Tail, he is going to a very nice prairie area north of my town. 

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49171892527_c6b4eebb9b_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49171650911_21bf867bfd_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49171653026_dfcb06b70d_b.jpg)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSxSjLtVkFQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7cKwmPBmCY

It was a great day,  here is hoping the hawks are sleeping well tonight
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on December 12, 2019, 06:50:05 PM
It takes many devoted people across the state to rescue and release raptors.  Many times we do a relay transfer.  Today I had a Great Horned Owl that a Game and Parks officer had picked up from a person that called in the downed owl.  He relayed it to me and then I took it to the Rehab center.  It had two damaged wings and also flat flies (which are annoying flies that live on the birds).  On my way I got a message from the rehab center asking if I could take a Great Horned Owl to another volunteer to release it. I got the injured owl to the center and then got the owl for release.   So I made a call to another transporter and asked if she could meet up with me for the transfer, which she was happy to do.  She had rescued the owl and now she got to return it back to her territory.  My owl that I took in was in bad shape so sometimes you just hope it is not suffering anymore.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49211563557_64844400be_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on December 30, 2019, 12:10:51 PM
Just a few birds in the last couple days.  Raptors and vehicles are not a good mix.  I have had one that had terrible feather damage to both wings and it also had a fracture of its leg.  My guess is only the feathers were broke off by dragging on the pavement while stuck in the grill of the car (only a guess).  Made a nice little nest for it to lay in

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49300903402_554f762f1c_b.jpg)


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49300695626_30bce450ea_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on December 30, 2019, 12:21:07 PM
Right before Christmas a Great Horned Owl was needing transport,  we were able to help with a relay.  When I got the owl it was rather busy as you can see by the hole in the box.  I transported it to another driver to take on to the rehab center.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49299745336_af30813028_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49299746041_09344c0cfb_b.jpg)

I believe this to be a female just because of the size,  oh she was such a beauty,  I hope the fractured wing will be repaired quickly.
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on December 30, 2019, 12:33:01 PM
Thank goodness there are people that see a hurt raptor and call authorities so they can get help for them.  Red-tail Hawks live here year round and we get them in with some kind of wing injury most of the time.  This Red-tail has a broken wing up by its shoulder so I was able to wrap the wing and get a body wrap around it to secure the whole wing.  Once I had it stable I found a transporter that would meet me part way and then she would drive it to the rehab.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49299746046_d21c568938_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49299257238_ebe40c2907_b.jpg)
I gave it a pain pill and a few bits of a mouse before it left.
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on December 30, 2019, 12:44:28 PM
Well this is bird number 520 for the year.  It is a Great Horned Owl which came to me during the winter storm we had yesterday.  It was found in the backyard on the ground.  It is very thin but otherwise I could find nothing broken.  He seems alert and hisses with a little clacking.  I got him warmed up and dry,  gave it some water because it was dehydrated.  Started him on a few pinkies last night and after a couple it grabbed the next couple and swallowed on its own.  This morning it got a few more pinkies and water with carnivore care again.  The Carnivore care is a powder substance that has some extra nutrients.  He is hanging in there,  I think the weather and the roads will be better tomorrow to transport him to the rehab center.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49299744236_29a8a012b2_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49299952087_e939068161_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49300905066_87b5d4c83d_b.jpg)

Happy New Year !!!
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: Cawatcher on December 30, 2019, 12:53:18 PM
 :biggrin3 Wow making a difference Deb!
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: mishikeenhquay on December 30, 2019, 03:17:00 PM


miigwetch Deb for all that you do!
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: NancyM on December 31, 2019, 12:57:56 PM
terrific work, Deb - you are a life saver, for sure!

I have to ask, tho - what is a pinkie?  (not a little finger, I hope)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on December 31, 2019, 04:19:40 PM
Mice are listed in different sizes,  pinkies- small hairless mice ( easy for birds that are really thin and weak so they don't have to use much energy to digest),  small mouse - little fuzzy mice, large mice - adult size mouse,  rat- a very large meal for big raptors.   Hope that makes more sense,  also pinkies with no fur are a pink color.
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: NancyM on December 31, 2019, 06:50:58 PM
Thanks for the clarification!
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on January 11, 2020, 01:34:46 PM
Last week I got a call in the evening to see if I could help out with  a Golden Eagle that was sick,  it was thought to have lead poisoning.
 They needed to get it to the rehab center as soon as possible so it was brought to me about 9:30 at night and we were able to get some fluids in and I put some low heat under it. He was really unable to stand up on its feet,  was using its wings to help with balance.   Later that night I went back and gave some more fluids (water with carnivore care). He was making a strange call so I recorded it. Early the next day I was off to get it to the rehab center.  When there it was weighed and then given some extra fluids for hydration and then a shot of the chelation EDTA medicine which is used to pull out the lead from its body.  I told the director about his calls and I played what I recorded for her.  She said that was a cry he was making,  talk about sadness. The treatment is done everyday for 5 days and then hold for 2 days and then blood work and probably repeat the treatment again.  The reason for keeping the eagle hydrated is the medicine makes the kidneys work really hard to rid the body of the lead.  Saturday he is holding his own but still has a long road to recovery, but he has made it this far.  I hope that getting him to the center as fast as we did can make a difference.  We have to thank our network of transport volunteers.


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49368781066_a78c04581c_b.jpg)

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(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49368318873_594fc51ae3_b.jpg)

I was just amazed at two things,  these beautiful feathers on its head and the feathers and talons of its feet.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49368318823_5f22d9e468_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: jeavverhey on January 13, 2020, 02:16:54 AM
Thank you  for doing that Deb and thanks to your volunteer transporters too. I hope he makes it.
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on January 20, 2020, 08:17:23 PM
Sad update.....  the golden eagle died this last saturday morning.  They had done one round of chelation treatment and were on the second round.  It still was not standing and didn't have much energy.  The reason I went to the center on Sunday was I had another Golden Eagle and a GHOW to take there.
 The GHOW had head trauma and was doing good at this time,  the Golden was an adult female presenting with lead poisoning.  She weighed in at 8.8 lbs (which she should weigh much much more).  They started her on the EDTA treatment and gave her two things of subcutaneous fluids and offered her some food which she looked at but didn't eat.  We hope that she can make it.   Keep some positive thoughts going for her.  Lead poisoning is such a terrible death and if they live it is a long road to recovery.
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on February 17, 2020, 08:52:36 PM
February 2020

I got a call from our Rehab director that a Red-tail that I picked up in November from right here on the edge of town was ready to be released.  Sunday the volunteer transporter stopped here to give me the bird,  I called the lady that reported the injured bird and she was unavailable.  Well I decided to go to the area and let her go anyways.   When I drove to the area there were few kids playing on the nearby playground and I decided to go an ask them if they wanted to see something really cool.
 They were all excited,  they came over to my car and as I got the box out they were asking all sorts of questions about the box.  I got my gloves on and told them to stand away from the box while I got out the surprise.   I got her out and was able to show about 8 kids this lovely female Red-tali Hawk.  One gal was there when we picked up this injured bird and she remember how hurt it was.  The hawk had a broken wing and also an abrasion on her breast.  She was all healed up and ready to go.
 We got everyone in position so they could watch her fly free.  Then the time came and the kids all counted down and we let her go,  that sure was special.


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49551109741_2e54ec5e2b_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49550610378_d921837b65_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49550610373_bf1f1db866_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49548033057_e202774fc7_b.jpg)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=razwuyvrhHA
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on April 14, 2020, 07:29:45 PM
March went by and nothing exciting, which is good.  April is now baby season and of course Great Horned Owls are the early nesters.
 We have had some strong winds these last few days.  This causes some issues with nest going down or babies falling out of the nest.  Thank goodness people still got out for walks and found the little owlets.  The ones I had were all different ages. 


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49767445641_29de188394_b.jpg)

This one is a little older,  the little one in the first photo really liked to snuggle with this one.  It missed his mom and sibblings

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49767445496_d480037d7d_b.jpg)

They are all doing well with their new parent

There are foster Mums at the Rehab center that will take them and raise them like their very own.  This way they grow up know what an owl looks like and can be released back to the wild.  Just as I got back from taking those 2 little ones I got a call about another owlet on the ground.  This one is a bit older yet.


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49766908318_67cb3ff505_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on April 30, 2020, 09:47:01 PM
Getting a call to go rescue is always interesting.  You just don't know what you are going to encounter.  My rescue the other day was one of those nights.  It started out as a call about an owl,  well when talking to the person he said it was pretty big.  I had a nice box in the car but i put in another a little bigger just in case it was a bigger bird.  My trip took about 40 minutes to get there and the man met me at the spot, it was a grain elevator and he had caught it and put it in the garage for the evening.  We go in and of course it is not where he put it,  oh gosh you know there could be many hiding places there.  I started looking and found it under the vehicle......  it was a baby great horned owl ( not very big and ferocious ).  I got the smaller box and the info recorded and just then I got another call from the Raptor Transport lady.  She wanted to know if I had got the owl and I told her I was just finishing up,  she was very happy I was there because another call had just came in and it was just a couple miles from my location.  I got the number of the person and called him,  he told me he had seen this bird in the same spot all day and was thinking something might be wrong.  He was not sure but it could be an eagle or a hawk,  it was located by a little pond by the highway.  Well with that information I left to go look at that location.  Now this is going through my mind -  if there is a bird no matter what it is the spare box I have is possibly not going to work.  Well I will cross that bridge when I get there.  I get to the spot, get out and start walking around the pond....  I get around to the other side and OMG I see the bird....  I see a large bird sitting in the grasses above the pond,  it looks at me but is still laying down.  It is an eagle about 3-4 (I am not sure of the age because I really don't see different ages).  I now have to go back to the car and get a towel to help with the capture and I see that my spare box is not going to work so I will have to come up with a plan.

Now to the rescue-  I get up to the eagle and it of course gets up and starts to flap and run away.  It is unable to fly due to a wing issue that i can see.  It now goes down the bank into the water.  I am not going in at this point, thought I would see how it was doing.  It is able to do the swim move and kinda walk cause the water is not that deep.  I wave the towel and yell to get it across the water.  Once it got across and came up on the bank I ran over to it and it is now very wet and can't move very fast,  it went on its back and of course put it talons out to protect itself and attack me.  That is when the towel comes in,  i throw the towel on it and grab the feet.  I now have the bird and get it all under control and back to the car.  Now a trucker stops to see if I need help,  he thought I had car trouble... he looks at what I have and realized that I have a big bird.  He was in awe at seeing an eagle so close.  I ask if he would have anything in his truck that could hold an eagle,  no such luck.  Now we need to come up with a plan.  I have another towel so we wrap it up and the other towel is wrapped around the feet.  I had the back seat cleared and a blanket on the seat,  I placed the eagle in the seat and he helped get the seat belt around the eagle and secured for a little trip.  I was going to go into the nearest town and see if I could find a place that would have a large box to transfer it to.  I was lucky to find a man that was on the fire dept and he had a box at the station that we could get the eagle into.  Now I feel better and can drive home. 

Once home the eagle is in a nice quiet place and I can take care of the owlet,  I had set out some food before I left so the little one could have some food.  Now it is time that I can eat....  What an adventure for the evening.

What a cute owlet


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49831367523_448dde5e33_b.jpg)


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49831901241_d5ed2c2efb_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49831901216_f5fdb0f5ba_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49832211897_655604a21c_b.jpg)

Not very happy with me but at least we could get to a place to get help.

At the Raptor Rehab center it was checked over and blood work done,  lead levels were low and the injured wing had a very large bruise with swelling around the elbow.  Hope for a speedy recovery.  I sure would like to have a chance to release this one.

Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on April 30, 2020, 10:04:15 PM
To follow up with the rescue transport of the eagle and owlet, I had a chance to take them to the hospital center the next morning.  While we were tending to the eagle we looked over at the box with the little owl.  That was so cute we took  photos.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49831613038_5f66156df2_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49832148116_cdd94c6acb_b.jpg)

I think the box label was so funny as he was peeking out looking for us.  I don't really think he was as ferocious as the Kraken from the movie.
Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: gmadeb3 on May 25, 2020, 03:12:42 PM
Great Horned Owls nest early and thus begins the baby season.  The little owls can get blown out of their nest with some of these strong winds.
 sometimes as they get a bit older they may get out of the nest and then fall and last they are close to flying and get out on the branches and fall.  If they are old enough and on the ground parents will still take care of them and they are also good climbers.  So I had a variety of youngsters that I rescued.




(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49789959541_cd05e2d0fa_b.jpg)
this one the parent was around so I put it back up in the tree.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49787205326_2ab6820490_b.jpg)

Title: Re: Deb's Transport, Transfer and Release Station 2019-2020
Post by: mishikeenhquay on June 05, 2020, 09:10:00 AM


Beautiful winged one!